a gross exaggeration

quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
As either would be a gross exaggeration, there is in (the) context no detectable difference in meaning.


For a start, I find the expression "a gross exaggeration" very amusing as well as exotic. I guess it indicates a(n) huge/extreme/great/enormous exaggeration, but I doubt if my versions all read well.
Second, I wonder why it's not "in the context" but "in context" since it's in the definite context. Thanks for your comments.





http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=702328
 
  • Blues Piano Man

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Gross exaggeration" is as you surmised: large, or extreme, or huge, etc. It indicates more exaggeration than just the word "exaggeration" by itself.

    As for your question regarding "In the context," I can't tell because I don't know what the sentence is talking about without more context.


    As either would be a gross exaggeration, there is in (the) context no detectable difference in meaning.


    For a start, I find the expression "a gross exaggeration" very amusing as well as exotic. I guess it indicates a(n) huge/extreme/great/enormous exaggeration, but I doubt if my versions all read well.
    Second, I wonder why it's not "in the context" but "in context" since it's in the definite context. Thanks for your comments.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Though I don't normally speak for another person, "in context" (formal usage), he must mean "extreme". The meaning "disgusting" is quite informal - I would even call it slang.

    "In context" means in the environment where they (the two participles) are found. Panj could have said "in this context" or "in the context you have supplied", but in that context, he preferred the more succinct phrase "in context".
     

    Blues Piano Man

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Though I don't normally speak for another person, "in context" (formal usage), he must mean "extreme". The meaning "disgusting" is quite informal - I would even call it slang.

    "In context" means in the environment where they (the two participles) are found. Panj could have said "in this context" or "in the context you have supplied", but in that context, he preferred the more succinct phrase "in context".
    Thanks, Forero. I finally understand what the sentence means.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ~~Chuckle~~
    As either would be a gross exaggeration, there is in (the) context no detectable difference in meaning.
    It's not a great sentence, even for 1:23 in the middle of the night.

    First, the original version of the sentence ended with "... there is no detectable difference in meaning."
    At that point I realised that there is of course a difference in meaning, but that the difference is irrelevant in the context of someone who is eagerly looking forward to a good dinner. So I edited the post. I should have taken a bit more care. qd's inserted (the) is a good repair :)

    In BE, gross (adjective) does not have the "disgusting" meaning that it does in AE. Extreme or outrageous, perhaps.

    It would not be unusual to say "I'm starving" in this context. An exaggeration of course.
    I'm starving to death (not dead yet but nearly), or I'm starved to death (I'm dead already) are serious overstatements - or gross exaggerations :)
     
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