a Grove of Various Orchids translated into blooming, brandalin, bylandling, browning, or branling?

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
One of my students just registered a clothes brand, whose Chinese meaning is
" a Grove of Various Orchids ".
Now she wants to translate the Chinese name, whose sound in Chinese is "bailanlin", into English. People have suggested five names:
Blooming(the meaning is suitable for clothes and the sound is similar to the Chinese one);
Brandalin(no meaning, just has a good sound);
Bylandling(also has no meaning, and just has a good sound);
Browning(the sound is similar to Chinese one, but the meaning seems to be far away from clothes);
Branling(Bran is a lovely character of a song, "ling" is similar to the Chinese character "lin").

I don't now if there is anyone proper among them. Could you give me some advice about the translation please?
Thank you in advance
 
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  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    If some meaning in English is required I suggest Blooming. It is the first part of the name of the famous American department store Bloomingdale's.
    But why not 'Blossom' or 'Blossoms'.
    In BE the word 'blooming' is also a very mild harmless rather old fashioned form of swearing replacing the word 'bloody', associated with London dialect.
    'Where's them bloomin' kids got to?'
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's not at all 'catchy'. 'Orchid Grove' would be better in English. It will still be the same Chinese word, won't it. Why does the English name have to even sound like the Chinese name?:confused:
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    It's not at all 'catchy'. 'Orchid Grove' would be better in English. It will still be the same Chinese word, won't it. Why does the English name have to even sound like the Chinese name?:confused:
    Because sound is quite important for brands. That's why there are lots of names which sound catchy and take the English forms:p
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think I'd have to speak Chinese to advise you. :) But some of the suggestions such as 'browning' are absolutely not acceptable if the English meaning matters at all. Dead flowers turn brown!
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Blooming(the meaning is suitable for clothes and the sound is similar to the Chinese one);
    OK-ish-ish.
    Brandalin(no meaning, just has a good sound);
    Sounds like a brand name medicine, perhaps to treat burns.
    Bylandling(also has no meaning, and just has a good sound);
    Sounds strange to me, probably because its elements have little relation to the usual English word derivations, when put together. It sounds vaguely Anglo- Saxon/Viking, like the name for a small-sized or cherished SF character who's from a place called the Byland.
    Browning(the sound is similar to Chinese one, but the meaning seems to be far away from clothes);
    Unpleasant or ridiculous associations on the whole.
    Branling(Bran is a lovely character of a song, "ling" is similar to the Chinese character "lin").
    A sort of small breakfast cereal?


    <Edited to clarify quotation format. Cagey, moderator.>
     
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