A has more in common with her arch-nemesis B than she would like to give herself credit for.

shiness

Senior Member
Korean, South Korea.
Clearly Lindsay has more in common with her arch-nemesis Paris Hilton than she would like to give herself credit for.


Hello. .

Now, the quotation of a news article is something that foreigners, such as myself studying English as 2nd language, are easily lost in its indication presumably due to its figurative usage of words or unusually written style.

First off, I have no idea of what arch-nemesis stands for.

Second, Is the author trying to tell us that Lindsay and Paris Hilton have something very common in their personality (or character) aside from what Lindsay herself would claim what is inside of her?

I may well be totally mistaken, please let me hear from you and get your valueable opinions over this.

Many thanks.​
 
  • Lemminkäinen

    Senior Member
    Norwegian (bokmål)
    First off, I have no idea of what arch-nemesis stands for.
    It means 'enemy', in the sense of 'someone's worst, #1 enemy'.

    I find it hard to say something more about that sentence without more context. If I'd written something like that without any more context, I'd use '[...]than she would like to admit herself'.
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Clearly Lindsay has more in common with her arch-nemesis Paris Hilton than she would like to give herself credit for.


    Hello. .​

    Now, the quotation of a news article is something that foreigners, such as myself studying English as 2nd language, are easily lost in its indication presumably due to its figurative usage of words or unusually written style.​

    First off, I have no idea of what arch-nemesis stands for.​

    Second, Is the author trying to tell us that Lindsay and Paris Hilton have something very common in their personality (or character) aside from what Lindsay herself would claim what is inside of her?​

    I may well be totally mistaken, please let me hear from you and get your valueable opinions over this.​


    Many thanks.​
    0. The sentence is not written in an unusual style. Why would you say such a thing as a non-native when you have less of an idea of normalcy?

    1. How very odd. As a child of mid-90s Saturday morning cartoons, "Arch-nemesis" is more regular to me than "archenemy." However, they both mean the same thing. It is the ultimate enemy, the enemy to beat all other enemies. Her Satan to God, her Lord Voldemort to Harry Potter, her Doctor Claw to Inspector Gadget.

    2. Yes! Quite correct. He is saying that Lindsay Lohan and Paris Hilton are practically the same person in character, so it is therefore comical that they are arch-enemies.

    3. Is it disturbing that I immediately knew that you were talking about Lindsay Lohan? Too much collegehumor.com, I suppose.
     

    shiness

    Senior Member
    Korean, South Korea.
    Thanks for opinion. I now think I'm through it.

    I didn't want to downplay the organization of the original article though, I only forgot to add "To my knowledge that is, from a perspective of a 2nd-language learning person." Next time perhaps I will be more precise on writing. :)
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Thanks for opinion. I now think I'm through it.

    I didn't want to downplay the organization of the original article though, I only forgot to add "To my knowledge that is, from a perspective of a 2nd-language learning person." Next time perhaps I will be more precise on writing. :)
    Naturally that is what I understood :). I tend to notice from time to time people from certain languages have a tough time with English politeness as it seems to be abnormal in their culture. Anything where you can imply absolute uncertainty helps you out.

    It seems to me...

    It appears to be...

    I know I'm not a native, but could it possibly be...

    Etc. etc.

    We're a complicated bunch, us English speakers, and I don't blame you at all!
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Actually the sentence is poorly stated.

    One "gives oneself credit" for good things. Credits are good things.

    It's pretty clear they meant to write that Ms. Lohan and Ms. Hilton have more in common than Ms. Lohan "would like to admit."

    Paris is a better person than Lindsay gives her credit for.
    Lindsay is prettier than Paris gives her credit for.

    Only works with positive attributes.

    "Than _____ would like to admit" works both ways.

    Lindsay is a worse driver than she would like to admit. (negative)
    Paris is a better driver than Lindsay would like to admit.
    (positive)

    See the difference?
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Actually the sentence is poorly stated.

    One "gives oneself credit" for good things. Credits are good things.

    It's pretty clear they meant to write that Ms. Lohan and Ms. Hilton have more in common than Ms. Lohan "would like to admit."

    Paris is a better person than Lindsay gives her credit for.
    Lindsay is prettier than Paris gives her credit for.

    Only works with positive attributes.

    "Than _____ would like to admit" works both ways.

    Lindsay is a worse driver than she would like to admit. (negative)
    Paris is a better driver than Lindsay would like to admit.
    (positive)

    See the difference?
    I disagree.

    Clearly Lindsay has more in common with her arch-nemesis Paris Hilton than she would like to give herself credit for.

    She would like to give herself credit for not having much in common with her. The sentence fits well, though I agree with you that "would like to admit" is what I would have used.
     

    The Singularity

    Member
    English , Canada
    Also note that arch-nemesis has a very distinct meaning, not just simple a #1 enemy. Arch-nemesis means that they at the same level. For instance, I can be a worst enemy to Superman, but because he would crush me with one thumb I could not be his arch-nemesis. I could, however, be his arch-nemesis if I was a Superwoman, or someone who is on-par with his strength.
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Also note that arch-nemesis has a very distinct meaning, not just simple a #1 enemy. Arch-nemesis means that they at the same level. For instance, I can be a worst enemy to Superman, but because he would crush me with one thumb I could not be his arch-nemesis. I could, however, be his arch-nemesis if I was a Superwoman, or someone who is on-par with his strength.
    :confused: I have never heard this usage. An arch-nemesis to me is a perfect synonym with archenemy.
     

    chitch

    New Member
    English
    :confused: I have never heard this usage. An arch-nemesis to me is a perfect synonym with archenemy.
    An enemy may have less or more power than their opponent.
    A nemesis has equal powers to their opponent and cannot beat their opponent or be beaten.

    A fight with your enemy would have one winner. A fight with your nemesis would not have a winner as neither person could overcome the other.

    As a general rule, correct grammar confuses the British public. If someone who speaks English as their first language tells you the popular meaning of a word, they are more likely to be correct than a dusty text book written by a beardy weirdy in 1939!

    Good luck with the English language quest though.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Leaving aside arch, which simply means number one or principal, a distinction should be drawn between enemy and nemesis. An enemy can bring you down, while your nemesis will ultimately cause your downfall.
    The writer should probably have used arch-rival, although I don't know enough about Lindsay to be sure of this.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    while your nemesis will ultimately cause your downfall.
    I don't agree with that interpretation. If you have a nemesis, then surely you are also your nemisis's nemisis. If the above is true, then mutual destruction is assured since you must cause each other's downfall. ;)
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Leaving aside arch, which simply means number one or principal, a distinction should be drawn between enemy and nemesis. An enemy can bring you down, while your nemesis will ultimately cause your downfall.
    The writer should probably have used arch-rival, although I don't know enough about Lindsay to be sure of this.
    I agree with you, E2E Four. I think this writer didn't trust the power of the word "nemesis" and somehow thought that tacking an "arch" onto it made it sound more impressive.
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    I disagree.

    Clearly Lindsay has more in common with her arch-nemesis Paris Hilton than she would like to give herself credit for.

    She would like to give herself credit for not having much in common with her. The sentence fits well, though I agree with you that "would like to admit" is what I would have used.
    I disagree. In fact I think yr logic is so tortured that it has more in common with the young ladies in question than it would care to admit.

    As for nemesis: a nemesis is someone who wants to bring one to justice. Only bad guys have nemeses, arch- or otherwise. Batman is the Joker's arch-nemesis. To call the Joker Batman's arch-nemesis is to side with the Joker and cheer for Batman's demise. To use 'nemesis' as a synonym for 'enemy' is just plain lazy and ignorant writing.
     
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