A healthy heart and a wet mouth!

Coeurdunautre

New Member
English - USA
Hello everyone. I am wondering how to best translate an Irish phrase into Italian in a way that the meaning is truly understood.

The phrase is: Croí follain agus gob fliuch.
Which means: A healthy heart and a wet mouth!

What I came up with on my own is: "Che il vostro cuore sia sano e il vostro bicchiere sia pieno." I thought that this might make more sense and sound less awkward than "Un cuore sano e una bocca bagnata." If anyone has any suggestions or advice to offer on how to word this phrase in a natural and graceful sounding way, I would very much appreciate it.

Or if there's any other traditional Italian toast with a similar meaning or that references wine in some way, I'd love to hear that as well.

Thank you!
 
  • curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Hi Couer, and welcome to the Forum!:)
    I must confess I wasn't familiar with this phrase, didn't understand the sense in English, until I saw your translation. If that is what the phrase means, then I like your translation because its meaning is clearer (to me) than in English - and I think it works in Italian. However the "nativi" might disagree with me, as the second translation is certainly closer to the original. So you might want to wait for another opinion (maybe tomorrow, since it's almost 1 a.m. in Italy now).

    Italians don't seem to have the Irish tradition of making lengthy toasts (the usual toasts are either "Salute" or "cin cin"). They do however have a number of proverbs and/or expressions on the subject of drinking. Here are a couple of my favorites:
    - "Non puoi avere la moglie ubriaca e la botte piena."
    - "L'acqua arruginisce lo stomaco."
     

    oria

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi you

    Paul, pay attention to the word order: "la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca" is how we say it, at least in the South. Also, this expression is often used used ironically ("vuole la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca" ) to mean sb who wants it all, 2 things incompatible with each other.

    As for "cuore sano e bocca bagnata": cuore sano e' chiaro, bocca bagnata non rende affatto l'idea. Se e' per un brindisi, puoi dire: "che il cuore sia allegro e il bicchiere pieno".
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Paul??? My name isn't Paul. Thanks anyway for the "dritta" about word order. I should have been more specific about that saying: it isn't actually one of my favorites, as I find it extremely sexist. However it does manage to stick in my mind (though in the wrong order:)) .

    Regarding "cuore sano" I disagree. I find "sano" to be a much more literal translation of "healthy", than "forte." The problem you have with "bocca bagnata" is the same one I have with "wet mouth." Maybe Tegs (our Irish mod) could suggest a better translation from the original Irish. Or maybe we could work with "becco bagnato" since I have heard the expression "bagnarsi il becco" referred to drinking.
     

    giginho

    Senior Member
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Paul??? My name isn't Paul. Thanks anyway for the "dritta" about word order. I should have been more specific about that saying: it isn't actually one of my favorites, as I find it extremely sexist. Me too! I want to know why I cannot get drunk just because I'm a man! I claim my right to get drunk (to drunk myself out....does this expression exist or is a Giginho creation, Fall Winter 2012??? However it does manage to stick in my mind (though in the wrong order:)) .

    Regarding "cuore sano" I disagree. I find "sano" to be a much more literal translation of "healthy", than "forte." The problem you have with "bocca bagnata" is the same one I have with "wet mouth." Maybe Tegs (our Irish mod) could suggest a better translation from the original Irish. Or maybe we could work with "becco bagnato" since I have heard the expression "bagnarsi il becco" referred to drinking.
    Curio, (Paul???? you cannot be serious!) I agree with you: we don't have any motto that could fit the Irish one but I think the one proposed by Couer could do the job.

    P.S. we are very very imaginative and we create our own toast.....often not in a very polite way!!! (toast??? how coult it be a sandwich in Italy and a brindisi overseas???? S.P.Q.I. sono pazzi questi inglesi!!)

    P.S.2 Tegs, we need you!!!!
     

    Bella63

    Senior Member
    British-English
    Personally I like Oria's "che il cuore sia allegro (and forte works for me too) e il bicchiere pieno" even if the toast (yes Gigi English is a lovely and weird language :D) wants the glass to be emptied!!!
    Bella
     

    oria

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Sorry, Curiosone! I don't know where I got that Paul from...

    Yes, of course "sano" is literal for "healthy", but I don't think it's important in this context; more than anything you want to convey the idea of cheerfulness and conviviality, this is why I thought of "allegro". "Forte" is better if you want to keep it more literal: after all, this is what a heart is supposed to be in order to be healthy!. "Sano" doesn't fit the context, in my opinion.
     

    AnnePk

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Sarebbe anche possibile dire: "Che il cuore sia sano e il bicchiere sempre pieno!", come un augurio di lunga vita e di grandi bevute. Un'altra possibilità: "Lunga vita e bicchiere sempre pieno", o qualcosa di questo tipo. "Cuore allegro" è ben diverso...
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Sarebbe anche possibile dire: "Che il cuore sia sano e il bicchiere sempre pieno!", come un augurio di lunga vita e di grandi bevute. Un'altra possibilità: "Lunga vita e bicchiere sempre pieno", o qualcosa di questo tipo. "Cuore allegro" è ben diverso...
    Era proprio questo il mio punto. Anche a me piace il suono di "cuore allegro", ma ho tradotto molti proverbi in via mia (per via di una raccolta che faccio), e ho imparato che è meglio stare più fedeli possibili al testo originale (e "allegro" cambia). Rileggendo il testo originale, credo si tratti di un detto (e non di un brindisi). E il mio studio di proverbi mi indica che sono una specie di insegnamento antico, tramandato per via orale. Quindi penso sia molto importante evitare di cambiarli troppo.
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    Ciao! Ecco, the Irish mod, hehe! I think you are all on right track with your translations. It basically means may you be healthy/happy and may you always have a drink at hand. Croi follain (sorry, I can't insert the accents) means healthy or happy heart - happy being more figurative. For example, there is a healthcare programme in Ireland called Clar an Chroi Fhollain (again I can't insert accents!), which is called The Happy Heart Programme in English. I think cuore allegro might work better than sano, but even the Irish is open to interpretation so you can chose to interpret it as either :) I hope that helps.
     
    Hello everyone. I am wondering how to best translate an Irish phrase into Italian in a way that the meaning is truly understood.

    The phrase is: Croí follain agus gob fliuch.
    Which means: A healthy heart and a wet mouth!

    What I came up with on my own is: "Che il vostro cuore sia sano e il vostro bicchiere sia pieno." I thought that this might make more sense and sound less awkward than "Un cuore sano e una bocca bagnata." If anyone has any suggestions or advice to offer on how to word this phrase in a natural and graceful sounding way, I would very much appreciate it.

    Or if there's any other traditional Italian toast with a similar meaning or that references wine in some way, I'd love to hear that as well.

    Thank you!
    I think that before that can be definitively translated, we must ask about the translation into English. To me it looks to be translated literally while it probably has an idiomatic meaning in the original language (whatever it is).
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I think that before that can be definitively translated, we must ask about the translation into English. To me it looks to be translated literally while it probably has an idiomatic meaning in the original language (whatever it is).
    Didn't you read the postings? It's been indicated quite clearly that the original language is Irish, and Gigi and I both asked Tegs (our Irish mod) to see if she couldn't provide some insight (or retranslation) of the original - which she did in post #10. So (if we put it all together), the alternative translation (into English) could be:
    "May you have a happy heart and a full glass." - which (again pooling the above discussion) should be something like "Che tu possa avere il cuore felice e il bicchiere pieno." (o forse "boccale pieno" - visto che il pensiero nasce in Irlanda :)).
     
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