A heavy rain set in.

magic dragon feeders

Senior Member
Japanese
I'd appreciate it if someone would answer my question about the following sentence (A). Thanks in advance.

A: At last a heavy rain set in.

Is this sentence a common one? (Sorry no context)
Does "a heavy rain" here mean a rainy season?
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I find it difficult to imagine how there could be no context, unless you made the sentence up yourself, in which case you should know what you mean.

    Where did you come across this sentence? Was it in a film, or in a book, or in a conversation? All these things can provide context too.
     

    magic dragon feeders

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I said there is no context. Strictly there is no English context. I'm now translating into English the passage written in the Japanese language. I think most native speakers of English can't read Japanese. So I won't write the Japanese context. I'd like you to just analyze. It's me that made sentence A, but I find similar sentences to these ones in google searches.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Strictly there is no English context.
    The context doesn't have to be in English originally. If it's in Japanese, you can explain it to us. What's going on in the passage that you're translating?

    I'd like you to just analyze.
    The context often determines the meaning. People will be in a better position to help if they have some context, and don't have to guess at what that sentence you've made up might mean.
     
    Last edited:

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    This does not refer to the rainy season, although it might be the rainy season for all we know.

    This means that it began to rain heavily, and it continued to rain for several hours, or perhaps all day.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    At last a heavy rain set in.

    I take it that this means more than "It began to rain heavily".

    "At last" - tells us that there has not been much rain for some time. Perhaps it was eagerly awaited.
    "A heavy rain" - maybe this is unusually heavy rain.

    "Set in" - suggests that it went on for some time, perhaps days or weeks.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I'd like to point out that this sentence is the OP's translation of something written in Japanese, for which he has refused to provide context. He has based it on "similar sentences" that he says he found "in Google searches", as per his last post. Shouldn't we wait for him to provide some context - a description of what that Japanese passage he's translating talks about, for instance? I'm not sure we're helping him in any way by commenting on this sentence that he's made up, on the basis of the limited knowledge we have.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Shouldn't we wait for him to provide some context - a description of what that Japanese passage he's translating talks about, for instance? I'm not sure we're helping him in any way by commenting on this sentence that he's made up, on the basis of the limited knowledge we have.
    :thumbsup:

    The OP seems to be mistaking "context" for "content" - context = background to the quotation.
     

    magic dragon feeders

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I think you are right in your pointing out.
    The context is as follows, but I don't know my translation makes good sense.
    ---- As June turned into July, the temperature went up, and the air contained a lot of moisture. The wheather made us feel so sultly. One day we had rain all day. ( )
    I tryed to fill in the parenthesis. I think "At last a heavy rain set in" should be "At last a rainy season has set in". A heavy rain is my mistake.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    One day we had rain all day. "At last," she sighed, "the rainy season has set in".
    -> although this is grammatically correct, it is not accurate nor idiomatic. One instance of rain would not necessarily mean that the rainy season had set in -

    The verb, to set in (phrasal verb. intr.) (= to have started and be continuing; to be established; to be in place) is usually only used in narration/description and only in a restricted number of tenses: will/would set in; had set in; set(simple past) in.

    To set in can be used in direct speech in the way you suggest (and the other tenses) but only after (in this case) the rainy season has been in progress for some time.
     
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