a <hectic> week at work

applefarm

Senior Member
Estonian
Can you help to understand the meaning of adjective
"hectic"
?
When to use it and what is the meaning and how it differs from "restless" and "anxious".

I understand that all the 3 mentioned above are synonyms in a way and are opposites of the adjective "calm".

So, when it is accurate context to use the word "hectic"?

And additionally one special phrase: "a hectic week at work"- what kind of workweek it can be? How such week differs from "a busy week"?

Thank you.
 
  • Hspo

    Senior Member
    British English (Yorkshire)
    hectic means full of incessant or frantic activity.
    For example a hectic day (= a very busy and exhausting day)
    synonyms: frantic, frenetic, very busy, very active...

    "a hectic week at work"- what kind of workweek it can be?
    this would evoke a very busy and exhausting week at work.
     

    applefarm

    Senior Member
    Estonian
    Are those translations correct:

    1. "a hectic day at work" = a very busy and exhausting day. The day had lot of things to do and those all made the person very tired.
    2. "a busyday at work" = a very busy day but not necessarily exhausting day. The day had lot of things to do but at the end of the day the person was not much tired.

    And a day cannot be "restless", but a nervous person can.
    And anxious describes persons who have anxiety disorder.

    Right?
     

    Hspo

    Senior Member
    British English (Yorkshire)
    1. "a hectic day at work" = a very busy and exhausting day.
    :tick:
    The day had lot of things to do and those all made the person very tired.
    You need to correct your English here, but the idea is correct.
    2. "a busyday at work" = a very busy day but not necessarily exhausting day.
    :tick: (busy day, not busyday, working week not workweek:warning:)
    And a day cannot be "restless", but a nervous person can.
    :tick:
    BUT an anxious person does not necessarily have an anxiety disorder. One may feel anxious but not need a tranquilizer!

    <-----Off-topic comment removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    applefarm

    Senior Member
    Estonian
    Thank you.

    Can you confirm that the idea is correct there:
    2. "a busy day at work" = a very busy day but not necessarily exhausting day.

    What is the difference between a "hectic day" and a "busy day"?

    Maybe so, that the phrase "busy day" empathizes that there was lack of time for some wishful event. For example if someone asks why i didn't call and i want to emphasize that i didn't have time for calling because lot of tasks at work, then i reply as "didn't call because it was a very busy day". One shouldn't say here that "didn't call because it was a hectic day". But when one asks how my day was and there was no obligation to call to someone and do other things beside the work then is it better to answer with "it was a hectic day today" and not to use the "busy day" here. Can you confirm that idea?
     

    applefarm

    Senior Member
    Estonian
    I guess this way is good to say:

    Hectic day = A crazy busy day. Like a running contest. Trying to do things that don't fit in time scale.
    Busy day = A day with quite lot of stuff to do but overall a "normal" day.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I guess this way is good to say:

    Hectic day = A crazy busy day. Like a running contest. Trying to do things that don't fit in time scale.
    Busy day = A day with quite lot of stuff to do but overall a "normal" day.
    I agree. On a hectic day, things have been unreasonable in some way. Maybe there were unplanned interruptions, or things went wrong, or there was just too much to do -- as you say.

    On a busy day, you may have worked very hard without stopping, but the work was done in a 'normal' way. You got a lot done, even if you didn't finish everything.
     
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