a hippy crash pad

  • Inouez

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Japan
    HI hypresto

    this is no context. this sentence is from Oxford dictionary.....

    Inouez
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Have you looked up hippy? It can cover a multitude of meanings because it was/is a lifestyle with numerous variations. The home has been turned into a crash pad - a place where people can stay for low rates. I’d assume it means scruffy/ casual/ bohemian/ full of mattresses with purple velvet cushions. Other people might visualise it differently - but that’s not important. The key thing is it’s unconventional.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    The meaning of "hippy" can be more broadly generalized to a bohemian, go-where-life-takes-you attitude or an unplanned, relaxed lifestyle.

    "Crash pad" does not necessarily suggest cheap lodging. To me, it suggests a place where people can go to "crash," to sleep, usually showing up without planning or prior notice. If someone stays at a friend's house for a night without prior planning, they are said to be "crashing" there.

    While "hippy" could suggest a specify style of furnishings or behavior such as sexual permissiveness, what I would suggest "hippy crash pad" could communicate, sans further context, is a place where people stay for the night, likely coming or going unannounced, with little or no notice.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Is it involved something like 1960's long hair, drug, sex, sort of stuff ?
    To me, he's saying it reminded him of the kinds of places that some of those people who called themselves hippies in the 1960s (or who other people called hippies) lived. It had the same look and atmosphere.

    A hippy crash pad was not well-organized and formal. It was very informal and people might come and go without the owner even knowing them and sleep (crash) anywhere at any time. The sense of ownership was less firm in a place like that. In theory everybody was sharing everything, including probably drugs.

    So his house reminded him of a place like that. Or what a place like that looked like in his imagination. But it doesn't mean it really was exactly like that and that the same things were happening.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    So his house reminded him of a place like that. Or what a place like that looked like in his imagination. But it doesn't mean it really was exactly like that and that the same things were happening.
    This is right. The original text is either dated or is likely intended as somewhat humorous or hyperbolic.

    I guess one lesson is to be wary of the words used in sample sentences when they don't belong to those words' dictionary entries. In other words, this is a reasonable usage for "transmogrify" but might be slightly less helpful for "hippy" or "crash pad."
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Honestly I had never heard of "transmogrify" before the Calvin & Hobbes series on that term. I think I am not alone in that regard. It was a rarely used word prior to that, and I think it will fade in usage over time.

     

    Inouez

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Japan
    Thank you guys for very helpful advise.

    Especially, pad = house, or room and crash = sleep. I didn't know that.

    Inouez
     
    As an additional nuance, the verb "crash" in this sense doesn't always mean "go to sleep." But it does suggest a suddenly loss of bodily or mental energy to the point of exhaustion.

    EX: "I worked frantically all day long at the office trying to get the report done, and when I finally got home I sat in my chair and just crashed."

    (I felt all the energy drain from my body and mind for a while. I'm NOT saying I fell asleep)

    That usage is still current in AE.
     
    Last edited:

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    As an additional nuance, the verb "crash" in this sense doesn't always mean "go to sleep." But it does suggest a suddenly loss of bodily or mental energy to the point of exhaustion.
    Though I would caution that in the context of the initial example, the meaning intended is of "spending the night" and not implying extreme exhaustion.
     
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