a hit of cranberry oil

Mary49

Senior Member
Italian
Hi,
in a list of make-up products there is the description of a potion for skin of the face; they are drops of a liquid used to give vitality to tired complexions. The sentence is: "Ginger spice energizes and tones, whilst a hit of cranberry oil provides...". How much is "a hit of oil"? Can I translate it as "un po'"? Or is it a large amount? I don't know. Thanks if you can help me.
 
  • Fooler

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Stando all'intera descrizione del prodotto non è nemmeno quantificata la ginger spice però....

    Aggiunta ? o (letterale) Tocco ?

    Mio pensiero
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    In this context, "hit" is largely meaningless marketing-speak, I'm afraid--it certainly doesn't tell you anything about quantity. To the best of my knowledge, it comes from drug slang--a dose of heroin or the like is a "hit." I have no idea if there's an Italian equivalent, but "un tocco" might do well enough.
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thanks the artichoke, you are right! There is a lot of what you call "meaningless marketing speak", and it is very difficult to translate it. I think I'll go with "tocco".
     
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    Fooler

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    ....... To the best of my knowledge, it comes from drug slang--a dose of heroin or the like is a "hit." :tick: (as per our dictionary too hit=dose).
    In my opinion, it shouldn't sound weird in Italian using dose in this contest. Maybe mentre (l'aggiunta di) una piccola dose d'olio di mirtillo rosso......
     

    metazoan

    Senior Member
    US English
    I doubt that the writer was trying to use drug slang. I'm with @Benzene that it's a misprint of "hint".
    "Un tocco" covers both possibilities, but "dose" does not.
     
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    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I think it’s a typo, too, Mary. This website uses ‘hint’ for a different product with the same ingredient:

    The Truth About Cosmetics

    Beautycounter's cleansing balm is one of my all time favorite products. It's a light, airy balm with a hint of cranberry oil to give it an amazing scent. Deemed as the balm that does it all, you can use it as a cleanser or a moisturizer. Made with sunflower seed wax and a mix of oils, such as, avocado, jojoba, sweet almond and raspberry. ..........
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I doubt that the writer was trying to use drug slang. I'm with @Benzene that it's a misprint of "hint".
    "Un tocco" covers both possibilities, but "dose" does not.
    I'm fine with "un tocco" ("a hit of x" has become common enough that a lot of people won't associate it with its drug-slang origins any more) but just to show I'm not out to lunch in thinking "hit" isn't a typo, here's an example from the Lush website:
    Probably one of the most known qualities of lavender is its ability to help you feel relaxed. One sniff of its light, floral scent is enough to bring you back down to earth and help you feel calm and settled. When you need some serious relaxation, hop in the tub with Twilight (baths on their own are known relaxation inducers) for a hit of lavender and then keep your skin soothed and hydrated with Sleepy Body Lotion—a double hit of lavender for the sweetest dreams!
     
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    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I'm fine with "un tocco" ("a hit of x" has become common enough that a lot of people won't associate it with its drug-slang origins any more) but just to show I'm not out to lunch in thinking "hit" isn't a typo, here's an example from the Lush website:
    Probably one of the most known qualities of lavender is its ability to help you feel relaxed. One sniff of its light, floral scent is enough to bring you back down to earth and help you feel calm and settled. When you need some serious relaxation, hop in the tub with Twilight (baths on their own are known relaxation inducers) for a hit of lavender and then keep your skin soothed and hydrated with Sleepy Body Lotion—a double hit of lavender for the sweetest dreams!
    Lavender is well known for its ability to help you relax just from the smell, so the word ‘hit’ works quite well there. Cranberry oil, on the other hand, is better known for its antioxidant content and the fact that it’s absorbed well into the skin, not its smell. That’s why I think it’s a typo.
     
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    Passante

    Senior Member
    italian
    È stata detta una punta di? A volte ho sentito dire una caduta di...
    Lo so sono in ritardo, ma mi è venuto in mente ora. :rolleyes:
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    È stata detta una punta di? A volte ho sentito dire una caduta di...Lo so sono in ritardo, ma mi è venuto in mente ora. :rolleyes:
    Francamente "una caduta di" non l'ho mai sentita. Per quanto riguarda "una punta di" non lo userei per l'olio o altre sostanze liquide; è la quantità che sta sulla punta di un coltello o di un cucchiaio, ma questo non credo valga per i liquidi.
     

    Passante

    Senior Member
    italian
    Francamente "una caduta di" non l'ho mai sentita. Per quanto riguarda "una punta di" non lo userei per l'olio o altre sostanze liquide; è la quantità che sta sulla punta di un coltello o di un cucchiaio, ma questo non credo valga per i liquidi.
    Per caduta l'ho sentito per sostanze solide al posto di pugno: una caduta di sale, ma veramente poco, ma anche per liquidi aggiungete una caduta di latte, ma ammetto che doveva essere particolarmente creativo il tizio alla TV che lo diceva.
    Per punta concordo, ma dato che il tuo testo usa hit e punta comunque potrebbe essere assimilabile anche ai liquidi (il cucchiaio raccoglie anche un liquido) nonostante le giuste rimostranze mi sembra utilizzabile.
    Del resto un tocco e un pizzico richiamano comunque la mano e con un liquido anche loro ci azzeccano il giusto (a questo punto ci sta meglio una caduta).
    L'ideale sarebbe stato quantificarlo a gocce ma dato che si limita a dire hit.... Invece di usare drop. Magari ci si può dirigere su 'un filo d'olio' ?
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Il lavoro è già stato consegnato... Personalmente per un cosmetico non userei "filo d'olio", quello lo metti sui piatti da cuocere o già cucinati. Poi spiegami, come fai a far stare un liquido sulla punta di un cucchiaio?
     

    Passante

    Senior Member
    italian
    Il lavoro è già stato consegnato... Personalmente per un cosmetico non userei "filo d'olio", quello lo metti sui piatti da cuocere o già cucinati. Poi spiegami, come fai a far stare un liquido sulla punta di un cucchiaio?
    Lo inclini
    31548
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Potrebbe andare "sentore"?
    La presenza di "cranberry oil", secondo i produttori, deve fornire "...an anti-aging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory splash of moisturizing protection...". Forse il "sentore" non sarebbe in grado di fare ciò. :)
     
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