a homestay to/in the United States

brian&me

Senior Member
Chinese - China
Last year I went on a homestay to the United States. I lived with the Johnson family in the state of California.

(Let’s Go 5,OUP)

I wonder if the ‘to’ in the first sentence could be changed to ‘in’.

Thanks in advance.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Assuming “to go on a homestay” is idiomatic, yes you can. But it means reading the main statement differently:

    Last year I went to the United States (on a homestay)

    Last year I went on a homestay (in the United States)
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Thanks, lingobingo.
    I'd also like to know if 'go on a homestay' could be changed to 'go to a homestay' in the OP.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "A homestay" is a made-up word meaning "a home stay", where "home" is an adjective and "stay" is a noun. Most of us have never seen it used before now. To learn "how it is used", you need to find text using it, written by the travel planners that use the word "homestay".

    Last year I went on a homestay to the United States.
    This sentence uses "homestay" to mean the entire trip, including the travel. We say "go on a trip", so this is probably okay. If you add the missing word "trip" the sentence is definitely okay:

    Last year I went on a homestay trip to the United States.

    We can't say "in a trip" or "to a trip" or "in a stay" or "to a stay". So I don't think we can say either of these:

    Last year I went in a homestay to the United States.
    Last year I went to a homestay in the United States.
     
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