a hot season

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HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
What is meant by 'a hot season' here? A time in which you are in your prime?

Because the reason people still talk fondly of Benny, still consider him almost a member of their families, is that day after day, year after year, he let the public see that talent and dignity are not mutually exclusive qualities; that if you treat people the way you'd like to be treated yourself, not only will they appreciate it, but they will accept you into their lives not just for a hot season or two, but for the long run.
("Chevrolet Summers, Dairy Queen Nights" by Bob Greene)
 
  • HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    He is Jack Benny, an American comedian, vaudvillian, radio, television, and film actor, and violinist (Wikepedia) if this helps you, Myridon. I know it does because he seems to be everybody's Benny.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi, Hiro.

    I interpret "hot season" to mean "a season in which you are especially popular or fashionable." Your phrase - "in your prime" - seems reasonable if the performer's prime is brief enough to fit within a season or two.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "Impressive" and "very good" are the specific entries in the dictionary that relate to this use of hot - although both WRF dictionaries categorize this as "slang' or "informal".
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Hi, owlman. Hi, Julian.

    Thanks. Thanks very much. I take 'you' here to be the general public or anyone including lay persons. This 'hot season' could be a time you are doing well or maybe best, couldn't it?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome, Hiro.

    It definitely refers to a season in which the performer is having professional success. If a performer is having a "hot season", the public loves that performer at that time. As you know, the public can be fickle. Performers who are wildly popular for a year may drop out of sight when people get tired of them.

    I think "prime" refers to the performer's ability rather than the public's love for that performer. "Hot season" refers to the public's love for that performer. The performer may be at his prime during the hot season, but the season is really "hot" because the public is buying tickets for the performer's shows.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Here, Bob is talking widely about your life, anyone's life, not just performers'. How you should treat others and all that --- what goes around comes around. A hot season is for professionals, right? But it is used as figurative to refer to anybody here, isn't it?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Greene seems to be using "you" to mean "you if you are a performer." It doesn't make much sense to talk about "hot seasons" for bankers and garbage collectors.
     
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