a hundred acres to a field

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Tea Addict

Senior Member
Republic of Korea Korean
Hello everyone. I would like to know what "a hundred acres to a field" means in the following sentences:

The grass beside the railroad had been burnt over; it was a smudge prickly with charred stalks of weeds. Beyond the undeviating barbed-wire fences were clumps of golden rod. Only this thin hedge shut them off from the plains-shorn wheat-lands of autumn, a hundred acres to a field, prickly and gray near-by but in the blurred distance like tawny velvet stretched over dipping hillocks. The long rows of wheat-shocks marched like soldiers in worn yellow tabards.

- Sinclair Lewis, Main Street, Chapter 3

Carol and Kennicott returned from their honeymoon and were on their way to Gopher Prairie, Kennicott's hometown. Around the train, there stretched a great prairie.

In the underlined part, I could not quite grasp its meaning, because its construction is not familiar to me.
Does it mean that the field's area amounted to a hundred acres? Or that after a hundred acres a field appeared...?

I would very much appreciate your help. :)
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    There were many fields, and they are each (typically) a hundred acres in area. There being many fields isn't obvious from the context, but we don't use "...to a..." when there is just one of the things.
     

    Tea Addict

    Senior Member
    Republic of Korea Korean
    Dear Uncle Jack,

    Thank you very much for the explanation!
    So there were several fields on the prairie, and each field area amounted to a hundred acres.
    I truly appreciate your help. :)
     
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