a hustler

kenny4528

Senior Member
Mandarin, Taiwan
Hi there, just wonder about the usage of hustler in the sense I made up:

John: Would you like a game of pool, Ken?
Dave: Yeah, what about that, Ken, you play pool?
Ken: Not really.
Dave said to John jokingly: He is probably a hustler.
The background of this sample is that they were not very close friends and Dave and John thought why Ken gave the answer was just because he's shy or not to show off. Does huslter sound normal in conversation like this?
 
  • Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    The Hustler is the title of both a novel and movie about a small-time pool shark. Your dialog would fit right in the film. Unfortunately, it's an old film. 'Hustler' is a slang term, it's dated, and it probably isn't used much, particularly by anyone younger than their sixties.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    The Hustler is the title of both a novel and movie about a small-time pool shark. Your dialog would fit right in the film. Unfortunately, it's an old film. 'Hustler' is a slang term, it's dated, and it probably isn't used much, particularly by anyone younger than their sixties.
    Thank you. This dialouge is in relation to the novel I'm reading where it used hustler in this way, (I adapted it a bit in my original post, actually). The book is quite old, which led me to wondering if it's still used nowadays.
     
    Last edited:

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    "Hustler" is still used to refer to people who try make money through betting on games like pool or bastketball, particularly if they're trying to make a living in this manner.
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I agree that using "hustler" to refer to someone who is very good at pool but who keeps that fact quiet in order to con other players sounds somewhat old-fashioned. It also seems rather AE to me. Perhaps you've come across "pool shark" during your travels in Australia. That's the term we used in my misspent, pool-playing youth (about 10-15 years ago).
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Thank you for your replies.
    Perhaps you've come across "pool shark" during your travels in Australia.
    I hadn't met any "pool shark" in Australia.:) Now I uderstand why the author used hustler in his novel.
     

    sergiofreeman

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi!
    I was looking up this word in the dictionary and I can see it has different meanings, possitive and negative, I wanted to know if it would be used in a possitive way (as a hard worker person) without doubt that it is possitive, for instance, could I say:
    I’m a hustler and keep on doing what I have to do.
    Besides let me know please if is it used with the meaning of prostitute or hooker.
    Many Thanks , You are really very nice to help me with English.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I was looking up this word in the dictionary and I can see it has different meanings, positive and negative.

    I wanted to know if it would be used in a positive way (as a hard worker person) without doubt that it is positive, for instance, could I say: I’m a hustler and keep on doing what I have to do.

    Besides let me know please if it is used with the meaning of prostitute or hooker.
    "Hustler" has indeed been used to mean prostitute or hooker--not so much now, but certainly in the past.

    It has also been used to mean a fast-talking salesman or even a con man (swindler); again, this use occurred more in the past.

    And yes, "hustler" can definitely be used in a positive* sense: "That new worker in our office is a real hustler"--meaning that he's very energetic, eager to learn, works quickly, and so on. This use is current.

    *This word has only one "s"; I've corrected your spelling above.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think the term hustle has been revived in BrE with a popular TV series called Hustle, and following that The Real Hustle. (The links take you to the Wikipedia on the TV series.) Both series are still running on BBC. Both are about con jobs in contemporary settings, and the terms hustle and hustler are used.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I would be very careful with the context of some of these sentences as there is another common meaning (at least in American English) which no one has yet mentioned - prostitute. It's also the title of a popular magazine featuring pictures of nude women.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I would be very careful with the context of some of these sentences as there is another common meaning (at least in American English) which no one has yet mentioned - prostitute.
    I think you'll find it was mentioned in posts 9 & 10, Myridon;).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Ooops, sorry. Print too small - couldn't read it. :) However, post 10 makes it sound like the meaning may be obsolete and I assure you that some of these sentences out of context have brought it to my mind.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I would be very careful with the context of some of these sentences as there is another common meaning (at least in American English) which no one has yet mentioned - prostitute. It's also the title of a popular magazine featuring pictures of nude women.
    As Loob has pointed out, that usage was brought up earlier. It's old hat now, along with the nearly-40-year-old porn periodical.
     
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