A is a credit to B

Discussion in 'English Only' started by huynhvantinhftu, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. huynhvantinhftu

    huynhvantinhftu Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    1. According to Cambridge: a credit to someone/something Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
    a credit to someone/something
    to be so good or successful that the people or things that made you successful should be mentioned:

    (A) Thomas is a credit to our school.
    According to the definition, I understand: Thomas is a good/successful person and our school has helped Thomas be good/successful. And Thomas owes his success to our school.

    2. According to Macmillan be a credit to someone (phrase) definition and synonyms | Macmillan Dictionary
    be a credit to someone (in this definition, the dictionary doesn't refer to "be a credit to something", but I think they are the same)
    if you are a credit to someone connected with you, or if you do them credit, they should be proud of you

    (A) Thomas is a credit to our school.
    According to the definition, I understand: Our school is proud of Thomas because he, a successful person, is a member of our school. In this definition, the sentence doesn't say that our school help Thomas be successful or that Thomas owes his success to our school. Maybe he is an inborn talent, so, if he is not the member of our school, he is still successful.

    3. According to OALD credit_1 noun - Definition, pictures, pronunciation and usage notes | Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com
    The meaning No.8: [singular] credit to somebody/something a person or thing whose qualities or achievements are praised and who therefore earns respect for somebody/something else

    (A) Thomas is a credit to our school.
    I understand: Thomas is a successful person, and he has been already praised for his success. So he earns respect for our school, that is to say, our school get respect because we have a member like Thomas. The sentence doesn't say that our school help Thomas be successful or that Thomas owes his success to our school. Maybe he is an inborn talent.

    It seems that the definitions of Macmillan and OALD are the same. I wonder if my observations are correct and which is the precise meaning of "A is a credit to B"
    Thank you for taking the trouble to help me.
     
  2. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    'Thomas is a credit to our school' means the school is proud of his achievements and successes. We assume the school has played at least some part in them.
     
  3. huynhvantinhftu

    huynhvantinhftu Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    I thank you so much, Hermione Golightly.
    Can I say: (B) Thomas is the pride of our school.
    (A) Thomas is a credit to our school.
    Do A and B have the same meaning?
     
  4. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    B) is not something that would ever be said by a school. They might say 'We are very proud of Thomas'.
     
  5. huynhvantinhftu

    huynhvantinhftu Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    It means we can say that in another situation.
    (C) The new stadium is the pride of the town.
    (D) The new stadium is a credit to the town.
    Are they the same (or in the loosest sense of the word)?
     
  6. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    They aren't 'the same'. One says the town is proud of the new stadium and the other says the town deserves praise/credit for the stadium.
    There are very few synonyms.
     
  7. huynhvantinhftu

    huynhvantinhftu Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    I thank you again, Hermione Golightly. :)
     

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