A is for Apple

jmulqueen

Senior Member
English - USA
In American English (and maybe BrEng too), when children are learning their letters, they often hear songs or see posters with a list of example words for each letter. A common phrase associated with this practice is 'A is for Apple'. Is there an equivalent in German?

Note, this is different (at least in English) than when one is trying to spell out something over the phone (e.g., "My name is 'Smith' spelled 's' as in snake, 'm' as in Michael, etc.). It is also different from military/radio lingo in a similar context (e.g., "The target's name is 'Smith'. Sienna, Mike, India, Tango, Hotel").

Does such a thing exist in German?

Thanks
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    It does exist, like when you are trying to spell your name to people on the phone.

    If I remember correctly: "A, wie bei Anna", but I think the German eliminates the "wie bei", even on the phone, so it comes out: "A" Anna.

    Maybe it is related to the military way of doing it. Not sure.

    EDIT: Remembering even more, I think non-military people do use just words, like you describe above for the military.
     

    jmulqueen

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Right, but that's not the same thing that children would use to learn the letters right? It's my understanding that in Austria, no one says the 'wie bei' part, they just rattle off the names (as one would with radio chatter/military lingo).

    But I have to assume that this isn't the same thing that kids would use for learning letters. The whole point of the 'A is for Apple' is that you see a picture of the letter 'A' and a big red apple to help you associate the sound with the letter. A picture of 'Anna' wouldn't do that.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I just found this "Buchstabiertafel":

    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buchstabiertafel

    It's apparently "Anton" in high German---I must have heard "Anna" in the southern part of Germany.

    EDIT: And now I see I'm missing your point, or just getting it. Sorry.

    You want the equivalent of "A is for apple". Hmmm. Sorry for the misunderstanding.
     

    jmulqueen

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    OK, so this is cool, but I think you're missing my point. I'm not looking for the NATO alphabet equivalent in German, but a different thing altogether. I'm looking to see if there is something used for children to teach them the alphabet. I'm not looking for a way to spell out letters on the phone.
     

    jmulqueen

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Ah ok awesome. So it's pretty much the same. Thanks, I was searching a bit too literally (A ist fuer Apfel).

    Thanks for your help!
     
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