A ist A', und B ist B'.

cheshire

Senior Member
Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
A ist A', und B ist B'. (Das/Es/Dies)...
When you have to chose from the parenthesis to refer to either A or B, Which word is the most appropriate? Are there perhaps other options?
 
  • Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    Are you talking about mathematical expressions? If so, I would leave it this way - without any of your suggested articles. However, your phrase doesn't make too much sense to me (perhaps it is only lack of imagination on my part). So could you be a bit more specific about the context? :)

    Ralf
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    FFB ist ein Fuchs und cheshire ist ein Katze. 1) Das ist mein Lieblingskatze.
    2)Es ist mein... 3)Dies ist mein...

    From which should I choose?
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    cheshire said:
    FFB ist ein Fuchs und cheshire ist ein Katze. 1) Das ist mein Lieblingskatze.
    2)Es ist mein... 3)Dies ist mein...

    From which should I choose?
    Hm, I'm afraid my confusion has subsided only slightly. In my opinion all of them are possible:

    Referring to a photograph of a single cat you could explain "Das/dies ist meine Lieblingskatze."

    Referring to a photograph of two cats or to several photographs of different cats, you can say something like "Das ist meine Lieblingskatze und dies ist die Katze meiner Freundin" -you can swap the position of "das" and "dies" as you like. Please note, in both cases you are referring/ pointing out to visible objets/ items.

    Assuming you've just answered a call and your friend asks who was calling, you can say: "Es war FFB, er wollte wissen, wie es meiner Katze geht." ;)

    I hope I got your point right.

    Ralf
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    From what I know so far, all those words can be used for invisible things/persons. Let me change my example sentence a little.
    FFB ist ein Fuchs und cheshire ist ein Katze. 1) Das (invisible) ist mein einziger Freund.
    4) When you want to refer to FFB by "das," is "das" replaceable with other words such as "dies" or "es"?
    5) When you want to refer to cheshire by "das," ....?
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    Well, I think you can't generalize it this way. In fact, in my previous post I pointed out that "das/dies" can be used to refer to visible things.

    Das ist meine Katze. Dies ist meine Katze. (... when showing photographs of it)
    Das ist mein einziger Freund.
    In this specific example the visbility/invisiblility of a person/ object/ item /entity is eventually misleading. You can say:

    FFB ist mein einziger Freund. (it doesn't matter if he's around)
    Natürlich kenne ich FFB. Er ist mein einziger Freund. (he is most likely not around and thus not visible)
    If you want to introduce him to your parents you might say: Das ist mein Freund. or: Das ist FFB, mein Freund. (he is definitely with you at that very moment)
    Wer ist da am Telefon? - Es ist mein Freund. (definitely not visible in this case)

    Again, this can't be generalized. It is more a matter of feel for language than of strict rules to follow.

    Ralf
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    Milch fuer babys,
    Ralf fuer uns!
    I appreciate your help!

    "It/That can also be said about..."
    Es/Das/Dies are all possible for its translation, and as you've explained "das" and "dies" have more "visible" feel in it, right?
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    cheshire said:
    ...
    "It/That can also be said about..."
    Es/Das/Dies are all possible for its translation, and as you've explained "das" and "dies" have more "visible" feel in it, right?
    (1) Das kann man so sagen.
    (2) Dies kann man so sagen.
    (3) Man kann es so sagen.

    I really don't want to confuse you again. All of these are possible. However, my first choice would be (1). As I pointed out above, it has to do with feel for language. The criterion of visibility/invisibilty might be a sort of approach towards it, but can't be generalized. At least in my last examples it is not applicable at all. :)

    Ralf
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Catholic (Cat-holic, not Catholic)
    But would you admit by saying "das" in that example, you feel the object being referred to closer to you than other words, right (being visible is similar to being near, being familiar)?
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    Good point. It looks like your are already developing a certain feel for German. Besides, the same is true of dies. However, "das" has a more general connotation while "dies" implies that you are referring exactly to the object specified beforehand.

    Ralf
     
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