a legitimate fad

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Bombist

Member
Ukrainian
Hello,

I'm trying to understand the meaning of the bolded part
Eating worms for weight loss may seem crazy, but there is no end to what people will believe when it comes to quick weight-loss fixes.

In the future, worm pills may be a legitimate fad instead of a medicinal fraud.

By Sarah B. Weir, Shine Senior Writer | Healthy Living
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    From our dictionary
    legitimate adj /lɪˈdʒɪtɪmɪt/
    • born in lawful wedlock; enjoying full filial rights
    • conforming to established standards of usage, behaviour, etc
    • based on correct or acceptable principles of reasoning
    • authorized, sanctioned by, or in accordance with law
    • of, relating to, or ruling by hereditary right: a legitimate monarch
    • of or relating to a body of famous long-established plays as distinct from films, television, vaudeville, etc
    fad /fæd/ n informal
    • an intense but short-lived fashion; craze
    • a personal idiosyncrasy or whim
    Does that help?

    The author is a bit late. Bottles of tape-worm eggs were sold as an aid to weight loss in the 19th century.
     

    Bombist

    Member
    Ukrainian
    I understand the words separately, but the whole meaning of the phrase (In the future, worm pills may be a legitimate fad instead of a medicinal fraud) escapes me. What might be the reason for the legitimate worm pills?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    At the moment worm pills are seen as a fraud. The author is suggesting that people who want to lose weight can be persuaded to believe anything. There is a possibility that people will come to believe that worm pills are an effective way of losing weight, and so it could happen that it would be fashionable (a fad) to take them.

    That is the history of all supposedly quick ways to lose weight: belief that they work - in favour (fad) - reality (they don't work) - out of favour.
    Grapefruit diet, Atkinson diet, etc, etc.
     

    Bombist

    Member
    Ukrainian
    So from now on, if they will take the pills it isn't in consequence of a medicinal fraud but it is a legitimate fad?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    No "In the future, worm pills may be" - it's a suggestion that something might happen, not that it will or has.
     

    Bombist

    Member
    Ukrainian
    So from now on, if they take the pills it isn't in consequence of a medicinal fraud but it is a legitimate fad?
     

    Bombist

    Member
    Ukrainian
    Mosley kept a food diary during the six-week trial and noticed that he had been eating more carbohydrates, especially sugar and chocolate. When he weighed himself, contrary to myth, he had gained about 2 pounds.

    By Sarah B. Weir, Shine Senior Writer | Healthy Living
    What is the reason for taking the worm pills in the future or ever? I'm afraid I won't understand this sentence (In the future, worm pills may be a legitimate fad instead of a medicinal fraud) . I am so sorry for my stupidity.
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    The reason is that people don't want to believe that in order to lose weight they must eat less and be more active in order to use up calories. They would rather take a "magic pill".
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Right, so you also don't understand "worm pills". That is a new question. Please start a new thread.

    Andygc, moderator.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I must admit that, like Bombist, I'm decidedly puzzled by the collocation "legitimate fad". Did the author mean "something that might legitimately be called a fad" or "a fad legitimised by the approval of the relevant authorities" or ... ?:confused:

    I can't help feeling she would have done better to omit the word "legitimate" (and the word "medical"): In the future, worm pills may be a fad instead of a fraud.
     
    Last edited:

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Some hours later....

    I've now found the source of Bombist's quote, here (see the last paragraph of the article).

    It turns out that there are several sentences between the two that Bombist gave us: sentences dealing with the fact that the individual experimenting with the "tapeworm diet" has shared his findings with scientists, and the fact that there is scientific research going on into "worm therapy":
    In the past few years, researchers have been looking at worm therapy as a way to combat certain diseases. Some scientists hypothesize that our lack of exposure to parasites has led to an increase in asthma and allergies and autoimmune disorders such as Crohn's disease.
    So "legitimate" in the final sentence of the article In the future, worm pills may be a legitimate fad instead of a medical fraud evidently means "supported by scientific research".
     

    Bombist

    Member
    Ukrainian
    So "a legitimate fad" is connected with scientific researches, not with a desire for losing weight if I got it right. I can't believe I haven't thought of this before! Thank you very much Loob.
     
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