a level at which anything that suffices

Aidensuh

Member
Korean
The below is one of the answers for the thread I posted a few days ago.

Usually, this construction means that there is a level at which anything that suffices is equal to anything else that suffices.

So for example:

A pencil is as useful as any writing implement for jotting down a grocery list.
(or: A pencil is as useful a writing implement as any)

Kroger store brand cola is as tasty a carbonated beverage as any.
(or: Kroger store brand cola is as tasty as any carbonated beverage)

Q.
Usually, this construction means that there is a level at which anything that suffices is equal to anything else that suffices.

I am having difficulty understand the bolded phrase " anything that suffices". Anything that is enough? Enough to what? I'm very confused.

Q.
Usually, this construction means that there is a level at which anything that suffices is equal to anything else that suffices.

This sentence seems too complex for me to understand although I can kinda understand the gist.
This is how I broke it down.

There is (A). There is something else of the same kind, (B). (B) suffices at certain level. (A) will suffice at any level of (B).

How would you break it down, saving the words and the structure from the original sentence as many and close as possible?

Q. I have one last question about the "at which" construction in the sentence. Where does "at" come from? Is the below sentence right interpretation?

Anything that suffices is equal to anything else that suffices at a level.
 
Last edited:
  • Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    In your first question, you are describing a commodity. For example, in an American supermarket, I can walk in and purchase several brands of milk. The prices are similar, and they are all milk. A gallon of X milk is just as good as a gallon of Y milk. I just need a gallon of milk, so if both X and Y (and Z) meet government guidelines, any of them will suffice, if I need a gallon of milk. Brand X suffices, and Brand Y and Brand Z do, too.

    In your second question, the way the sentence is phrased (its construction) usually means that X is equal to Y and Z.

    Finally, we are discussing a level of quality (anything that suffices, or is good enough). We have to establish our standard or our level of quality. So, when we refer to that standard or level of quality, we want to know how high it (the level of quality/standard) is. We want to know where the bar or level is set, so we are discussing where (the level at which) our standard is.

    I think part of the problem is that you don't quite understand what this means. Let's look again at your re-stated version:

    "There is (A). There is something else of the same kind, (B). (B) suffices at certain level. (A) will suffice at any level of (B)."

    Unfortunately, these statements are not quite correct. There is a Brand A. (This is true.) There is something else of the same kind, Brand B. (Again, this is true.) B suffices at a certain level. (No. B meets the same level of quality that A does.) A will suffice at any level of B. (No. Here, we have some big problems with logic. There is only one 'level'. Either B is 'just as good as' A, and they are interchangeable, or they are not the same quality, and one is better than the other.)

    Finally, your last sentence does not work as written. You could say this: Anything that suffices is equal to anything else that suffices at a certain level.
     

    Cal inhibes

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    The sentence means: if one thing is sufficient for a given purpose, no thing can be more sufficient for that purpose.
    There are not different degrees of sufficiency.
    Regards.
     
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