a level ground which *it* is repose

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
Strength, goodness, mildness, purity and an involuntary inborn moderation in the characters and their actions: a level ground which it is repose and joy to the feet to walk upon: [...]
(Human, All Too Human; Volume Two, #99; translated by R.J. Hollingdale)

What tinge/connotation gives it to the sentence?

Thanks.
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Strength, goodness, mildness, purity and an involuntary inborn moderation in the characters and their actions: a level ground which it is repose and joy to the feet to walk upon: [...]
    (Human, All Too Human; Volume Two, #99; translated by R.J. Hollingdale)

    What tinge/connotation gives it to the sentence?

    Thanks.
    An awkward tinge? :) Honestly, it's much clearer without the "it" and flows much better, in my opinion. I would also have used "for the feet" rather than "to the feet":

    "...a level ground which [] is repose and joy for the feet to walk upon:..."
     

    SuprunP

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian & Russian
    "which it is repose" makes no sense. Have you left something out?
    I have just checked this sentence once more. Everything is as it is written in my book.

    My understanding of "a level ground which it is repose and joy to the feet to walk upon" is (approximately):

    "A level ground... it is repose and joy to the feet to walk upon it"
    "A level ground, which is repose and joy to the feet to walk upon".

     
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