a level of detail sufficient...

kansi

Senior Member
japanese
I think I've got the meaning of it.
❶Can we say like "I know this thing at a level of detail sufficient to write a book about it."?
❷if so, we can also say "I know this thing at a level of detail much enough to write a book about it." then what's the difference between this and the sufficient verson of it?

Model Systems Engineering Documents for Adaptive Signal Control Technology (ASCT) Systems: Executive Summary - Arterial Management Program - FHWA Operations
These model documents will provide valuable support to agencies at two distinctly different stages of project development.
* During the planning phase, the preparation of a Concept of Operations will clarify the agency's and other stakeholders' needs for an ASCT system that supports the mobility, air quality and other transportation objectives of the region. This will provide sufficient information to clearly define a project with an appropriate schedule and budget.
* During the project phase, the Concept of Operations can be used to develop system requirements to a level of detail sufficient to successfully procure an ASCT system, and then confirm the system successfully meets the agency's overall objectives.
<——-Excess quote removed by moderator (Florentia52)——->
 
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  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "A level of detail much enough" is incorrect. A more natural version of your first sentence would be "I know X in sufficient detail to write a book about it."
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    "A level of detail much enough" is incorrect. A more natural version of your first sentence would be "I know X in sufficient detail to write a book about it."
    I see.how about "I know X in detail enough to write a book"?

    a level of detail sufficient is used in the sentences on URL because it's formal sounding and fit the context?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    “in detail enough’ does not sound natural.

    In the OP example, what’s meant is a level of detail [that is] sufficient for a particular purpose.

    There is a slight problem here in that it’s the DEPTH (thoroughness, profundity) of detail that’s being referred to. But if you express that by calling it a “low” level of detail, it gives entirely the wrong impression!
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No, it’s not. Imagine a cake or a loaf of bread – you can have a certain amount of it, but not a certain level of it.

    An amount is a quantity. A level can be “A position on a scale of amount, quantity, extent, or quality”.
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    No, it’s not. Imagine a cake or a loaf of bread – you can have a certain amount of it, but not a certain level of it.

    An amount is a quantity. A level can be “A position on a scale of amount, quantity, extent, or quality”.
    ah I see. I read that on the dictionary so it's basically "a position".
     
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