a lexmark model CAPABLE TO print in a wide range of colours

susantash

Senior Member
Español de Uruguay
i everyone!

The title of this thread comes from a piece of writing of one of my students. I really don't like "capable to" at all. And not just because it should be "capable of" in the first place, but I don't even like "capable" in any case.
Let me give you a bit of context: this was supposed to be an e-mail for their company's head of purchasing stating that their old printer is broken and they should get a new one, so they have to recommend one they believe appropriate.

So, what would you say?
I thought of "a XX model which prints in a wide range of colours" but that's perhaps too simple.
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It should be either "capable of printing" or "able to print" (or completely rewritten). The writer seems to have confused the usage patterns of "capable" and "able".
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    It might be a less common phrasing, but inanimate things can have capabilities too. An elevator (BrE: lift) might be capable of holding ten people. I think any such sentence could be equivalently rephrased with "able to" as well.
     

    susantash

    Senior Member
    Español de Uruguay
    Great! Thanks a lot!
    Shame on me!:eek::eek: I'd never paid any attention to the "in context" link before!
    From now on I'll always use it. :thumbsup:
     
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