A little/ a little bit moist

Anne Shirley

New Member
Tagalog
Hello everyone,

May I know if both are correct?

1. It's a little moist today.
2. It's a little bit moist today.

Thank you.
 
  • Dodiad

    New Member
    English - American
    I have never heard anyone refer to the weather as moist. You would use moist to describe a material (such as cloth or paper) or something made of such a material: The towel is moist. It means slightly wet, but not extremely so.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    1. It's a little moist today.
    2. It's a little bit moist today.
    No mention of the weather, and it would indeed be odd if it were meant to be a comment on the weather. I could use either, if I were talking about the cake I like to bake every day.


    "A little bit" always sounds rather "conversational" to me, so there's the danger that it might sound childish in a piece of serious writing.
     

    Anne Shirley

    New Member
    Tagalog
    Is it
    No mention of the weather, and it would indeed be odd if it were meant to be a comment on the weather. I could use either, if I were talking about the cake I like to bake every day.


    "A little bit" always sounds rather "conversational" to me, so there's the danger that it might sound childish in a piece of serious writing.
    Is it better to say "It's quite humid today."?
     
    In that case “humid” would normally be the preferred term. Artistic license might allow “sodden” or some other similar term, but “humid” will always be safe and in almost all cases will be preferred.
    We've heard from one British person, but is the British consensus that British people generally do not say, about the weather, "It's very moist out, today."
     
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