a little more ...

8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
The following is a part of what I transcribed, listening to a radio program. The blank below is where I got stuck. #1, below, is a line in the skit, and in the comment #2, below, the commentator, an educated American woman, is talking about the word “peculiar,” which appeared in the line #1.

1. Risky behavior with mobile phones isn’t peculiar to drivers and pedestrians on the move.
2. “Peculiar” is sort of an interesting word. You can use it to mean “strange” or “unusual.” In this case it has a little more ( ) meaning of “restricted to” or “exclusive to.”

Which, (a) , (b), or (c), do you think she said for the blank?
(a) the
(b) than
(c) none of the above

I thought it was (a), but I don’t understand the meaning of the sentence. What do you think?
 
  • LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Hello, 8769

    You're right, only (a) makes sense.
    I'm not sure what you don't understand. Let me try to rephrase it for you.
    Peculiar sometimes means strange or unusual. But in this case (i.e. in sentence #1) its meaning is closer to "restricted to" or "exclusive to".

    Is it any clearer?
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    peculiar to means belonging characteristically or exclusively to.

    "a quaich is a drinking vessel peculiar to Scotland"
    "The walls were substantially built of black slate rock peculiar to Quebec"
     

    8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    Thank you all for your replies.

    Let me explain what I'd like to know.

    I wrote in my question posting:
    ...I don’t understand the meaning of the sentence. What do you think?
    My concern is not what "peculiar" means, but how to use "a little more".
    When A has "a little more" B, why is it that A is closer to B?

    Could you explain this, and/or give a few example sentences using this particular use of "a little more"?
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    OK, I'll try to be clearer than in my previous post. :)
    The sentence is
    In this case it has a little more the meaning of “restricted to” or “exclusive to.”
    In this case = as used in sentence #1. (risky behaviour........)
    it has the meaning of = it means

    The adverb a little more modifies has.
    In other words, your sentence could be paraphrased as....
    in sentence 1., it rather means "restricted to" or exclusive to" (rather...than "strange" or "unusual")

    It doesn't strike me as a "particular" use. However, I wouldn't say it is very elegantly worded.
    I'll be back: I'm trying to find examples. :)
     

    8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    An example using the same structure.
    A clementine is an oblate medium-sized fruit. Tangerines have a little more the aspect of an orange.
    Would it be possible to rewrite the example sentence you gave into the following?
    1. A clementine is an oblate medium-sized fruit. Tangerines have the aspect of an orange a little more.
    2. A clementine is an oblate medium-sized fruit. Tangerines a little more have the aspect of an orange.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Would it be possible to rewrite the example sentence you gave into the following?
    1. A clementine is an oblate medium-sized fruit. Tangerines have the aspect of an orange a little more.
    2. A clementine is an oblate medium-sized fruit. Tangerines a little more have the aspect of an orange.
    Nope, I don't think so.......Sorry.......

    Try this:
    --A clementine.............have a little more (of) the aspect of an orange.
     

    LV4-26

    Senior Member
    Would it be possible to rewrite the example sentence you gave into the following?
    1. A clementine is an oblate medium-sized fruit. Tangerines have the aspect of an orange a little more.
    2. A clementine is an oblate medium-sized fruit. Tangerines a little more have the aspect of an orange.
    You couldn't write any of those. However, you could perhaps say #1, in casual conversation. It wouldn't be very correct but would be understood. It would sound rather like you were "speaking faster than you were thinking". :)
    #2, I can't imagine being ever said, let alone written.

    However, those two examples show you seem to have now understood the structure in the original sentence. :)
     
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