a long ad

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,


I was watching a TV serial and it has two episodes per night. But there are many ads before the next episode. I wonder if my expression is idiomatic?


There is a long ad before the next episode.


(Since they all are ads, I use "a long ad" to replace "many ads".)


Thanks a lot
 
  • theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Hi there,

    "A long ad" implies just one, unusually long ad. It can't be used as a replacement for "many ads" or "a lot of ads" or "a long set of ads." If there's more than one ad, "ads" has to be plural, no matter how you put it.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    So these two expressions are fine but mean differently:

    There is a long ad before the next episode.
    There are many ads before the next episode.


     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In the U.S. it is rare for a commercial break to consist of only one ad. In fact, I can't think of a time when I've seen it. Our breaks are often two to four minutes long. The cost of airtime is usually too expensive for a single company to buy that large a block of time.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    In the U.S. it is rare for a commercial break to consist of only one ad. In fact, I can't think of a time when I've seen it. Our breaks are often two to four minutes long. The cost of airtime is usually too expensive for a single company to buy that large a block of time.
    Thanks a lot, James. But I guess my two expressions are fine? I don't think I need to change "many ads" to "breaks" or whatever.

    There is a long ad before the next episode.
    There are many ads before the next episode.

     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    "There is a long ad" specifically means that there is a single long advertisement before the next episode. If that's what you mean it makes sense. If you mean that the commercial break before the next episode is long but you know it consists of multiple ads I wouldn't say it that way. An ad and a commercial break are two different things. The ad's length is determined by the advertiser. The commercial break's length is determined by the channel. The break is carved up into mutiple ad "spots" here in the U.S. and you can buy a 15-second spot, a 30-second spot or even longer. The advertiser doesn't know how long the break in which is ad appears will be, only the amount of time allotted to his ad.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    "There is a long ad" specifically means that there is a single long advertisement before the next episode. If that's what you mean it makes sense. If you mean that the commercial break before the next episode is long but you know it consists of multiple ads I wouldn't say it that way. An ad and a commercial break are two different things. The ad's length is determined by the advertiser. The commercial break's length is determined by the channel. The break is carved up into mutiple ad "spots" here in the U.S. and you can buy a 15-second spot, a 30-second spot or even longer. The advertiser doesn't know how long the break in which is ad appears will be, only the amount of time allotted to his ad.
    Thanks a lot. And a quick look in our forum I didn't find any threads talking about the differences between ads and commercial, which I think they almost mean the same. And James, can I understand that you don't think "There are many ads before the next episode" make sense? If so, how to express the thought that there are many ads before next episode, and yes, the first expression is what I mean.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'd call it a 'long ad break', regardless of how many ads there are. 'Ad' goes with 'break', not 'long', when pronouncing it. But the correct term as James has said is 'long commercial break.

    'There are a lot of ads before the next episode' is a perfectly correct sentence which we might say. It's often more colloquial to use 'a lot of' than 'many'.

    Hermione
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I agree with Hermione. I have no problem with "there are a lot of ads before the next episode" or "there are a lot of commercials before the next episode". It sounds more natural to me than "there are many ads/commercials..."
     
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