a long, intricate sentence

homotopy07

Senior Member
Japanese
[Diaglog 1]
Student: Is this sentence correct?
Teacher: Yes, but you don't need to write a long, intricate sentence like this one. Write a short, punchy sentence.

[Diaglog 2]
Student: Is this sentence correct?
Teacher: Yes, but you don't need to write a long and intricate sentence like this one. Write a short and punchy sentence.

Which is correct?
 
  • Mr. Clean

    Member
    English - International
    [Diaglog 1]
    Student: Is this sentence correct?
    Teacher: Yes, but you don't need to write a long, intricate sentence like this one. Write a short, punchy sentence.

    [Diaglog 2]
    Student: Is this sentence correct?
    Teacher: Yes, but you don't need to write a long and intricate sentence like this one. Write a short and punchy sentence.

    Which is correct?
    Hi!

    Comma, or no comma. That stuff is really hard ... I have to look it up regularly.

    Your question made me think about coordinate adjectives and cumulative adjectives. So if you're interested in knowing more about use of comma and "and" similar to in your question, then have a look at this article from Grammar Girl: Commas with Adjectives

    I've got no affiliation with Grammar Girl. But it's such a good source for looking into stuff on your own that I wanted to share it with you. And of course you can ask people here if you're unsure about how to use something.

    Hope that helps!
     

    homotopy07

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thanks, Clean. :)

    Commas with Adjectives says,

    Just remember that if you can reverse your two adjectives or can place an “and” between them, you need a comma.

    Do you think that almost all native English speakers follow this "rule"?

    I don't have the slightest idea why “heavy [no comma here] bulky box" is wrong. :confused:
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    A great deal of nonsense is written about 'needing' commas, by people who have forgotten or have never known that punctuation is a form of good manners.

    Here I'd use the first sentence without any comma. If that offends some prescriptive people, too bad; I know I'm in excellent company among great writers of English.
     
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