a long time after

Bella1017

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi everyone, this is a sentence from a translation work I am checking now, and I haven't seen such phrase "for a long time after" . I want to ask do I need the word "after" here? what does the phrase mean? I am not sure if it is a mistake by the translator. The intended meaning is that my heart cannot be calm for a long time, and i was influenced by what the boss said.

When I heard my boss say that his company had been in business for 15 years, had made 5 million US dollars and that he’d recently bought a luxury villa, my heart was agitated for a long time after.
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Please tell us where your quote comes from, in general terms. It's not clear to me what exactly 'translation work' means.
    When I heard my boss say that his company had been in business for 15 years, had made 5 million US dollars and that he’d recently bought a luxury villa, my heart was agitated for a long time after.
    To comment on what you asked about in your OP, I would probably say "for a long time afterwards".
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    ....my heart was agitated for a long time after.

    This is totally unidiomatic. The rest of the sentence is fine.

    a) We don't talk about 'agitated' hearts.
    b) 'For a long time after' is rather clumsy. 'Afterwards' is better.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Not so bad to my ears (USA). An added phrase is "understood".

    When I heard my boss say that his company had been in business for 15 years, had made 5 million US dollars and that he’d recently bought a luxury villa, my heart was agitated for a long time after [hearing that].

    I agree that "my heart was agitated" sounds a bit much and very odd.

    I think "I was quite excited for a long time after."

    (And I think that Hermoine's "afterward" sounds better. But I would not complain about the "long time after."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    A common phrase is "my heart was troubled". That might be the phrase they were looking for. I think "after" and "afterwards" are both okay. I would probably write "afterwards".
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    My heart doesn't get 'agitated', unlike my mind! In the OP context, I might say "I was /felt very upset for a long time afterwards".
    As I said above.:)

    I like your suggestions. I only suggested 'I felt agitated' so as not to stray too far away from the original translator's version. I must say that I have almost always refused to correct other people's translations (a common occurrence at work, especially a few years ago when I was the only bilingual person in the entire, very large company I work for). More often than not it's easier to do them from scratch.


    Once I was asked to (read 'obliged to') correct an agency translation. It was so bad that I couldn't even understand it. I saved the company some money though: they didn't pay the agency and I had to do it.:eek::D
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top