a long time fan

hly2004

Banned
chinese
Hi, everyone:

I want to find an adjective which suggests "very long time" to modify "fans"

For example:

He is a ____fan of football.

More explanations:
a ___fan is one who likes it for a long time, and knows every thing about it.
The central idea is "a very old senior fan", as opposed to "rookie fan" who just take to it.

Best wishes
 
  • hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    Thank you, Dimcl.
    How about "diehard" or "hardcore"? (I don't the two words are ok though).

    In my language, it's literally called "bone ash“ fan. (So long being a fan of something, that he/she even turns into ashes). I hope to find a more vivid English term.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thank you, Dimcl.
    How about "diehard" or "hardcore"? (I don't the two words are ok though).

    In my language, it's literally called "bone ash“ fan. (So long being a fan of something, that he/she even turns into ashes). I hope to find a more vivid English term.
    Neither "diehard" or "hardcore" signifies the length of time that he's been a fan, Hly. They simply indicate that he's a staunch (and perhaps a little of the "fanatic" that "fan" is short for). One could assume that a "diehard" fan was a fan of some tenure but I simply think of a rabid fan when I hear "diehard" or "hardcore".
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    "Die-hard" (note the hyphen) and "hardcore" only imply their degree of fanaticism or dedication, not how long they have been fans.

    The adjective is "die-hard"; the noun form is "diehard."
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    How about a "dyed-in-the-wool" fan? That is someone who is so thoroughly a fan that he/ she will not change.

    The idiom is from wool that is dyed before it is woven into cloth, that is, the cloth had its color before it even was cloth.
     

    hly2004

    Banned
    chinese
    Thank you, Cagey.
    I think "dyed in the wool" is more closer in meaning to "hardcore", "die-hard" in the sense that it suggests "not changing".
    Maybe "a longtime fan" is right one here.
    For example:
    A: I'm a longtime fan of football. I became a fan at the age of 6. Now, I'm 80.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    If you are using a term that is somewhat derogatory it would be "sport's nut." That describes my bachelor son who watches the pre-game show and also the post-game show. That is where he picks up the Clichés that are necessary to use on the sport's talk radio shows. The French have a neat expression for the long time fan. He is Un Mordre, to bite and he is bitten by sports of one type or another.
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Thank you, Cagey.
    I think "dyed in the wool" is more closer in meaning to "hardcore", "die-hard" in the sense that it suggests "not changing".
    Maybe "a longtime fan" is right one here.
    For example:
    A: I'm a longtime fan of football. I became a fan at the age of 6. Now, I'm 80.
    They're all good suggestions. Roget's Thesaurus, amongst a number of synonyms, gives "lifelong". This may seem an exaggeration, as one can't be a fan in one's cradle, but we use it a lot in this sort of context.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    I like "lifelong fan", as suggested by Elwintee, and I wonder if "loyal fan" can convey the idea that the fan stays loyal throughout the time.......

    As others pointed out, "die-hard" has a different meaning, take me for example, I am a die-hard fan of heavy punk/rock, but I am also a lifelong fan of operas. (not the other way round)
     
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