a long two years/ two long years

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Eric Chengdu

Senior Member
Chinese
(in prison)
You keep watching that clock, it's gonna be a long two years.
You keep watching that colck, it's gonna be two long years.

(On a train)
You keep checking your watch, it's gonna be a long two stops.
You keep checking your watch, it's gonna be two long stops.

I just wonder which one is better and natural? Thanks
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    This is natural.

    You keep watching that clock, it's gonna be a long two years. :thumbsup:

    I don't know if either of these are natural. Well, the second one is definitely not but I don't think the first one is either. "Stops" are not time.

    You keep checking your watch, it's gonna be a long two stops.
    You keep checking your watch, it's gonna be two long stops.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    “It’s going to be two long years” — and even more so “two long stops” :eek: — is not a set phrase, although “two long years”, and variants for other periods of time, is a common expression that could fit in various contexts.

    However, it’s going to be a long [whatever period of time] is a set phrase, meaning that a specific period (such as a two-year jail sentence – good example!) will pass all the more slowly if you keep doing a certain thing.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I don't know if either of these are natural. Well, the second one is definitely not but I don't think the first one is either. "Stops" are not time.

    You keep checking your watch, it's gonna be a long two stops.
    It is, however, perfectly understandable.
     
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