A longtime friend.

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

My teacher tells us today if we think that if we think use only one word is too monotonous, we can use others synonyms to replace it. He says "a longtime friend" means "an old friend", is it true? Do some of you use it?

Thanks a lot
 
  • Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    If I say:

    He is my longtime friend.

    He is my old friend.

    I think the second is much easier to understand, isn't it?

    Honestly, in China, among those who speak English from time to time, they seldom use. But the term obviously makes sense.
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Yes, I think I would see something like "Longtime friends Prince Charles and Tara Palmer-Tonkinson were spotted at Harrods yesterday"* in a newspaper article more often than I would use it myself, especially in the context of saying "my longtime friend". "My old friend", or "an old friend of mine" sounds more natural for daily conversation.

    *No idea why that's the first example that pops into my head, it just does seem to me to be the kind of structure (or occasionally, euphemism) that journalists like.
     
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