a loose rope tail up from the main bite around his waist

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SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
He (Hal) is lying on the four skis with all the bindings tied firmly and tightly together in the centre (a so-called ski-raft). Hal is shot (hopefully not mortally) (the first wound is in the left hand, the second one in the back of his left shoulder).

She [Ragna] bound him to the raft with the remainder of the rope, tying it under his arms, tightly round his waist and hips, and down on to the bindings. [...]
Drawing a deep breath, she untied him and did the job all over again, this time leading a loose rope tail up from the main bite around his waist.
(Clare Francis; Wolf Winter)

Now that I know what 'bite' is (thanks to Copyright), but still being no better with 'knowing the ropes', so to say, I can't quite understand what the part in bold should mean.

1) ... leading a loose rope tail up from the main bite (that was) around his waist.
2) ... leading a loose rope tail up from the main bite (and) around his waist.

Can these two variants be possible and which one is correct?

Thanks.
 
  • wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The main bite was around his waist. The loose tail of rope came up (higher up his body, I take it) from there.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I thought 'bite' meant 'application'. However 'bight' makes better sense. The rest of the meaning here is unchanged.
     

    SuprunP

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian & Russian
    Thank you wandle.

    But is 2) still possible theoretically or is it ruled out completely? For example, the main bite/bight was fastened to the bindings and then the loose tail of rope came up (higher than the point of the fastening) and was tied around his waist.

    Thanks.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The phrase 'the main bite around his waist' will naturally be read as a unit.
    'Around his waist' would not be taken past 'the main bite', so as to refer to something earlier.
    To convey the meaning of (2), it would be necessary to say 'up from the main bite and around his waist'.
     
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