(?) a lot of fortune

8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
I see and hear the eepression "a large fortune." Do you say or write "a lot of fortune."
 
  • katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    No, I don't think so.

    "A large fortune" would mean a lot of money.

    A lot of fortune would mean plenty of good luck.
    if that makes any sense?

    I'm not sure about that particular phrase though, I'm sure someone else would know better.

    There are two meanings to the word fortune. one is to do with wealth. You would be rich if you had a fortune. The other is to do with luck, as in "good fortune".

    If you had both, you would be very fortunate indeed.
     

    Sr Salchicha

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    I agree with Katie

    To use the phrase in a sentence you could say:

    "In his life he has had a lot of fortune" meaning that he has had a lot of luck.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    "A lot of fortune" meaning "a lot of luck" sounds odd to me. I was surprised to see that it got quite a lot of google hits but on reviewing the list I see that there are a lot of phrases such as "a lot of fortune cookies" or "a lot of fortune 500 companies" etc.
     
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    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I agree with Timpeac; large fortune sounds odd. The closest idiomatic form is "great fortune". Here's a random authentic example: "I've had the great fortune to work on a variety of cool scientific projects".
     

    Moglet

    Senior Member
    UK
    British/Hiberno-English
    Typical examples:

    He inherited a large fortune from his late father. (Wealth-related)
    He has been very fortunate in his business life. (Luck-related)
    He had the great fortune to sell his shares before the stock market crashed. (Luck-related.)

    The term 'lot of fortune' (which, IMO, could at a stretch be luck-related, but never wealth-related) would sound very unnatural in BE or IE.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with Timpeac; large fortune sounds odd. The closest idiomatic form is "great fortune". Here's a random authentic example: "I've had the great fortune to work on a variety of cool scientific projects".
    But "a large fortune" would work in the sense of "a lot of money", surely, MM?
     
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