a lot of mileage out of the fact that no one outside the character's die-hard fandom saw it coming

theol

Senior Member
Japanese
What is the meaning of the sentence in red below,

<…> Star Ryan Reynolds and director David Leitch (Atomic Blonde) presumably had more money to work with this time around. The cast is bigger, and includes Atlanta’s Zazie Beetz (the lucky hero Domino) and Thanos himself, Josh Brolin (the cyborg Cable). But there’s one thing no amount of money and star power can give: the element of surprise. Deadpool got a lot of mileage out of the fact that no one outside the character's die-hard fandom saw it coming. <…>

I understand all the words, but I don't get it.

Thank you.

Source: “‘Deadpool 2’ Is What All Sequels Should Be,” by Angela Watercutter

<——-Edited by moderator (Florentia52) to provide source, and to eliminate excessive quotation——->
 
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  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Deadpool got a lot of publicity because no one who wasn't a serious fan knew that the Deadpool character would be in a movie – or for some of us, that Deadpool even existed. :D
     

    theol

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Deadpool got a lot of publicity because no one who wasn't a serious fan knew that the Deadpool character would be in a movie – or for some of us, that Deadpool even existed. :D
    Thank you so much.

    Would you mind breaking the original sentence into small pieces and explaining more how you figure out the meaning?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The source is a Wired review of the movie: Deadpool 2 Is What All Sequels Should Be: Better Than Its Predecessor

    The review begins: "Two years later, it’s hard to pinpoint exactly what was so enjoyable about the first Deadpool movie."

    Breakdown of the sentence:

    Deadpool got a lot of mileage (Deadpool, the original movie, got a lot of publicity and ticket sales)
    out of the fact that (because)
    no one outside the character's die-hard fandom (no one who wasn't a hardcore – a truly dedicated – fan)
    saw it coming. (saw the movie or its popularity coming, i.e. it was a total surprise)

    As an example, I had never heard of Deadpool, and yet when I went to a local cinema the other day, before our movie came on, there was a funny clip of the Deadpool character pretending to talk on his mobile phone during the screening of a movie. It was very witty approach to making people turn their phones off and it made me think I might like to see his movie.)
     
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    theol

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    The source is a Wired review of the movie: Deadpool 2 Is What All Sequels Should Be: Better Than Its Predecessor

    The review begins: "Two years later, it’s hard to pinpoint exactly what was so enjoyable about the first Deadpool movie."

    Breakdown of the sentence:

    Deadpool got a lot of mileage (Deadpool, the movie, got a lot of publicity and ticket sales)
    out of the fact that (because)
    no one outside the character's die-hard fandom (no one who wasn't a hardcore – a truly dedicated – fan)
    saw it coming. (saw the movie or its popularity coming, i.e. it was a total surprise)

    As an example, I had never heard of Deadpool, and yet when I went to a local cinema the other day, before our movie came on, there was a funny clip of the Deadpool character pretending to talk on his mobile phone during the screening of a movie. It was very witty approach to making people turn their phones off and it made me think I might like to see his movie.)
    Thanks
     

    prudent260

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Deadpool got a lot of mileage (Deadpool, the original movie, got a lot of publicity and ticket sales)
    Some cars have better mileage than the others.
    Is Deadpool got a lot of mileage a metaphorical use of the above sentence?
    Or does it mean leverage or advantage?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Mileage" is used figuratively in many different ways. This is one of them. It doesn't mean miles per gallon (efficiency). It means total miles traveled, in this context.

    So saying it got a lot of mileage means it traveled a long way (figuratively). People like new and exciting experiences. And this was a new thing they had never heard of before. So a lot of them came to see it to find out what it was about and why other people were saying it was very good. And so many people came and it was so unexpected that it was talked about in the news. And then more people learned about it and they came, too.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    No, it's completely figurative. It means the success of the movie went a long way. It traveled a far distance (figuratively) from being unknown to being very famous.
     

    prudent260

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No, it's completely figurative. It means the success of the movie went a long way. It traveled a far distance (figuratively) from being unknown to being very famous.
    Definition of MILEAGE
    "The car has got a lot of mileage" means it has traveled a long distance.
    I feel the sentence gives me a negative image about the car, probably old and dilapidated.

    On the contrary, Deadpool got a lot of mileage tells readers that the movie is a success.

    Sometimes it means something good and other times it means bad things. Do I understand it correctly?

    I am muddled, and thank you for your help.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, you understand correctly.

    There are two ways to look at it.

    Only well made cars can get a lot of mileage on them. Low quality cars die before that time. So the car might be old now, but it accomplished a lot in its lifetime.

    Two, it's figurative not literal. A movie can't wear out like a car can. We're still watching and enjoying movies made decades ago. So the farther a movie travels in popularity the better for its reputation.
     

    prudent260

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Yes, you understand correctly.

    There are two ways to look at it.

    Only well made cars can get a lot of mileage on them. Low quality cars die before that time. So the car might be old now, but it accomplished a lot in its lifetime.

    Two, it's figurative not literal. A movie can't wear out like a car can. We're still watching and enjoying movies made decades ago. So the farther a movie travels in popularity the better for its reputation.
    Thank you very much for your patience. :)
     
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