a loyal friend in Passepartout / a loyal friend, Passepartout

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Jardino

Senior Member
Korean
Topic
Dear Diary – My adventure is going to make a great story. I'm hoping to sell lots of books this time. Sometimes you need a big adventure to change your life. Even when your journey doesn't go to plan you just learn so much. Luckily for me, I've won a great prize – a loyal friend in Passepartout, and Sophia, a new friend and wife. It's good to be home.

[From BBC Learning English series 'The Race' Episode 10. Source added by DonnyB - moderator]

Um, quite weird for me , this phrase - "a loyal friend in Passepartout"
In have a variety meaning, so i don't have this is used for the meaning , which i don't know.
But can it's just used like this , a loyal friend, Passpartout ? " a loyal friend in Passpartout " very stragne for me.
 
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  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's probably short for "a loyal friend in the person of Passepartout".

    See this thread:
    in the person of somebody

    "In the person of" is used to introduce a specific reference to a person (Passepartout) after a general reference to the same person (loyal friend) .
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is an absolutely standard construction. The first part is the general description, the second is the specific example.

    I have a loyal friend (general description) in Passepartout (specific example).
    Great Britain has a long-standing ally (general) in Portugal (specific).
    Britain and the EU have an intractable problem (general) in the Irish border (specific).

    You will also see it reversed.

    In Rolls-Royce (specific), Britain has a world-class jet engine maker (general).
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It is an absolutely standard construction. The first part is the general description, the second is the specific example.

    I have a loyal friend (general description) in Passepartout (specific example).
    Great Britain has a long-standing ally (general) in Portugal (specific).
    Britain and the EU have an intractable problem (general) in the Irish border (specific).

    You will also see it reversed.

    In Rolls-Royce (specific), Britain has a world-class jet engine maker (general).
    Oh my... there are so many example. I've just understood it by Kentix answer - " in the person of somebody (= reprensted by ) "
    But your answer's getting my understanding quite complicated. So, now i need to look carefully when i see "sth in sth".
     
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