a lull in her bender

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
Does "a lull in her bender" suggest that Jackie recovered a little bit and appeared less drunk after a bout of heavy drinking?

Example: A heavy smell of dead smoke rolls out from inside. Like a battleground the morning after the war. Jackie is wearing an outfit blaring color and shine, with little beaded tassels on the sleeves. She’s only a little drunk, a lull in her bender.

Source: The Last Speaker Of The Language, Carol Anshaw

Background: Jackie, Darlyn's mother, fell back into the addictions of smoking, drinking and gambling that had put her family in tough spots over the years. After being told that Jackie had won a big windfall at a casino, Darlyn drove over to the hotel where she was staying to stop her from going to the casino again. Unsurprisingly, she was greeted by the rank smell of smoke and alcohol as Jackie opened the door.
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Sort of: she's been drinking heavily ... and she'll go on to drink heavily again ~ the lull in her bender is a short interval of time during which she's not drinking heavily.

    EDIT: As Morior said:)
     

    Jim2996

    Senior Member
    American English
    I thought lull means a pause, as in"There was a lull in the storm" (The storm stopped temporarily.) I still do, but I have a habit of using my dictionary all the time, and it isn't in there as a noun. I've found another meaning they have overlooked.

    A bender is indeed a bout of heavy drinking. It seems she stopped for a 'rest' after getting only a little drunk.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thank you very much. I'm more familiar with "a lull before the storm" than "a lull in the storm". Are they interchangeable or two different concepts? "Before" makes me think that you can't say "a lull before the storm " when you're in the calm eye of the storm because the storm has already come, but just stopped temporarily. You have to use "a lull in the storm".
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Thank you very much. I'm more familiar with "a lull before the storm" than "a lull in the storm". Are they interchangeable or two different concepts? "Before" makes me think that you can't say "a lull before the storm " when you're in the calm eye of the storm because the storm has already come, but just stopped temporarily. You have to use "a lull in the storm".
    I've never heard the expression lull before the storm, I say calm before the storm.;)
     

    Jim2996

    Senior Member
    American English
    ewie,
    Come on. Read the next two sentences. I was gently consoling her if she couldn't find it in her dictionary, gently suggesting that she look in a dictionary (it's a good habit), and commenting that dictionaries aren't perfect. I've been quoted out of context. :(

    redgiant,
    The lull before the storm refers to the wind stopping. I'm not a meteorologist, but apparently it goes from windy to not windy to stormy. There is a lull in the wind before a storm. It's a common idiom/metaphor to indicate that if things are too 'quiet', something 'loud' or undesirable is about to happen.
     
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