a luxury thing to eat

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Context and Background:

I told one of my friends that sometimes I did feel depressed and he suggested me eat some chocolate and I replied "Chocolate is a luxury thing to eat.*" At that moment, I thought of some famous brands of chocolate and I once read their prices online. Part of the conversation:

Silver-I sometimes feel depressed.
X-Try some chocolate.
Silver-Chocolate is a luxury thing to eat.

Questions:

Is the underlined part sounds natural?

Thought:

I had some possible answers like:

1)Chocolate is a luxury.
2)Chocolate is luxury.

But I think the * one is clearer. I need your help. But since I was thinking that "happiness" is a luxury for me, the following might work:

3)Chocolate is also a luxury thing to have.

I need your help.

Thanks a lot
 
  • Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    It's more idiomatic to call it a "luxury". You could also call it an "indulgence".
    Thanks a lot, Do you mean the following two:

    Chocolate is a luxury.
    Chocolate is an indulgence.

    But I think "indulgence" is not appropriate in this context, though.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Hi Silver,

    "Chocolate is a luxury" is the idiomatic way to put it, as Kevin points out above. But what are you trying to imply with this statement? That you don't want to eat chocolate to cheer yourself up because it's too expensive? Or that luxurious things are good for cheering yourself up? In the context of the conversation A: "I feel depressed" B: "Try some chocolate," the response "Chocolate is a luxury" would imply to me "I can't afford chocolate: it's too expensive."
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hi Silver,

    "Chocolate is a luxury" is the idiomatic way to put it, as Kevin points out above. But what are you trying to imply with this statement? That you don't want to eat chocolate to cheer yourself up because it's too expensive? Or that luxurious things are good for cheering yourself up? In the context of the conversation A: "I feel depressed" B: "Try some chocolate," the response "Chocolate is a luxury" would imply to me "I can't afford chocolate: it's too expensive."
    Sorry for not being clear:

    Yes, your understanding is correct. I complained to my friend I am not happy and he asked me to eat some chocolate because he believes that it could cheer me up. And I complained to him again that it's expensive to have chocolate because it's expensive; it's sold 200 dollars per box here in Chongqing. Of course we do have bad-quality ones, but he obviously doesn't want me to eat that dangerous type, which might cause problems to my health.

    Since I want to imply "That you don't want to eat chocolate to cheer yourself up because it's too expensive?", is it also fine to say "Chocolate is a luxury", or perhaps some of my suggestions (in the OP) are also fine and clearer?
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Stick with "chocolate is a luxury": a native speaker wouldn't say "a luxury thing to have/eat."

    If you want to make the point about its expense really clear, then say "[good] chocolate is a luxury I can't afford."

    It's a shame that good quality chocolate is so expensive where you are.:(
     
    Sorry for not being clear:

    Yes, your understanding is correct. I complained to my friend I am not happy and he asked me to eat some chocolate because he believes that it could cheer me up. And I complained to him again that it's expensive to have chocolate because it's expensive; it's sold 200 dollars per box here in Chongqing. Of course we do have bad-quality ones, but he obviously doesn't want me to eat that dangerous type, which might cause problems to my health.

    Since I want to imply "That you don't want to eat chocolate to cheer yourself up because it's too expensive?", is it also fine to say "Chocolate is a luxury", or perhaps some of my suggestions (in the OP) are also fine and clearer?
    Gosh! At that price, I'd go further and say "Chocolate is an extravagance"!
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    a native speaker wouldn't say "a luxury thing to have/eat."
    Hi, I have a new question. It's impossible to say the above, how about:

    It's a luxury to drink coffee in the Starbucks.

    The context is that "I have recently drank a few cups of coffee in the Starbucks, of course, each time, one cup, but most of the time, I didn't have any income, I think it's really expensive and unaffordable for me to drink here, so I say the above".

    Is it natural to use the phrase?
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thanks a lot, James.

    More context:

    38 yuan (middled-price, highest price)
    30-32 yuan (least price, you at least pay this)

    Most of the time, people also order cakes or desserts to go with this cup of coffee.

    Last time I drank there with my mother, two cups of coffee cost us 72 yuan. I told myself the other day I would go there every two months.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thanks a lot, James. I once read the online menu of Starbucks and I think you are right. The high price also appears in a ice-cream store called Häagen-Dazs and Pizza Hut.

    One scoop of ice-cream in Häagen-Dazs is at least 38 yuan.
     
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