a.m. [how to read out]

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
Or must it read as /ei em/ in English?

Thanks in advance

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Three male students and one female parent were attacked by a man with a kitchen knife at around 11:30 am while walking on the street sidewalk near Shanghai World Foreign Language Primary School, the victims’ school, local police said. Two students died, while another student and the parent are in stable condition.

-China Daily

Source
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    The letters are to be read separately and not as a single word, if that's what you mean.

    If they were to be read as a single word, the same would apply to pm. Not so easy with that.:D
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, I'd normally read it out as two letters, although I might occasionally also read it out as 'in the morning'. (Compare this with how we might read out eg as ee-gee or as 'for example'.)
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    If I remember my school Latin correctly, it is ante meridiem, meaning before midday. Meridiem is a noun; I suppose meridian is derived from a related adjective meridianus.
    Good catch.

    But if spell it as antemeridian, dozens of dictionaries support it as a correct spelling except that it becomes an adjective:
    Merrian-Webster:
    Definition of antemeridian
    : occurring before noon : of or relating to the forenoon antemeridian chores at 9 o'clock — compare ante meridiem

    Collins: ADJ before noon; in the morning

    More click: Definitions of antemeridian - OneLook Dictionary Search


    Yes, I'd normally read it out as two letters, although I might occasionally also read it out as 'in the morning'. (Compare this with how we might read out eg as ee-gee or as 'for example'.)
    If you've read it out as "in the morning", then you've thought it is an adjective?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    But if spell it as antemeridian
    "Spelling" is irrelevant. In English, those are completely different words.

    A.M. (ante meridiem) is two words in Latin. We still use Latin for some things in English.

    "Antemeridian" is one word in English. This has been an English word since 1650 (see etymonline.com).

    Occasionally English combines two words into one, but it usually does that with a dash:

    - I'm looking for a low-cost apartment.
    - She's a high-maintenance date.
     
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