A man abducted my son, but I negotiated () out of confinement.

< Previous | Next >

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The following is of my own making.
1. A man abducted my son, but I negotiated out of confinement.
I'd like to know I can omit the object him before "out of."
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Said this way, it makes no sense; or it gives the location, but not the object
    of the negotiation. (Sounds like the negotiator was confined!).

    1. A man abducted my son, but I negotiated out of confinement.

    Here is a variant which almost makes sense, but is odd; telegraphic.


    OP*1. A man abducted my son, but I negotiated release.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, bennymix, for your so very kind answer.:)
    I was wondering although we can deduce the object in the context if we should surely use the object.
     
    You could say, in grammar:

    A man abducted my son, but I negotiated an end of confinement.

    I'm not sure why anyone would want to speak that way, unless writing a headline or
    sending a telegram.

    It's a bit like saying, "My dog got lost yesterday, but I encountered an occurrence of resolution."

    Thank you, bennymix, for your so very kind answer.:)
    I was wondering although we can deduce the object in the context if we should surely use the object.
     
    Last edited:

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, bennymix, for your continuing support. :)
    1. A man abducted my son, but I negotiated out of confinement.
    2. A man abducted my son, but I negotiated myself out of confinement.
    You could say
    I need to deal with the structureㅡnegotiate A out of Bㅡto my example.
    I think I can say #2, and you say I can't say #1.
    I'd like to hear somewhat more of why, if may.
     
    My son locked me in the closet, but I negotiated myself out of confinement. :tick:

    PSJ, you need to have a sentence where the parts have a clear relation, else
    you're talking like, "Finding the window open, I got a drink for my thirst."

    By the way, the transitive verb 'negotiate' can be followed by

    peace,
    resolution,
    a new way of handling prisoners,
    my new salary

    Noun phrases.
     
    Last edited:

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I'm so sorry; I was just about to correct the wrong word.:(
    2. A man abducted me, but I negotiated myself out of confinement.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Thank you, bennymix, for your so very kind answer.:)
    I was wondering although we can deduce the object in the context if we should surely use the object.
    I think you can see now that the answer is "don't omit the object" - it can only cause confusion.
    It may be possible on occasion I suppose.
     
    I commented on the proposal, similar to that in the OP. You did not quote my comment, but
    if it's not clear, the proposal was NOT a recommendation of good, communicative English.

    I hope it's clear to the OP, that omitting crucial words--here, 'his'-- gives poor or incomprehensible results.

    [Bennymix:} Here is a variant which almost makes sense, but is odd; telegraphic.


    OP*1. A man abducted my son, but I negotiated release.


    ====
    Not "his release"?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top