A man brings me out of my thoughts...

ERASMO_GALENO

Senior Member
Perú, Español
#2
Hi,

Are you sure that's the correct way of saying it in English? Well, anyway, it think it would be: "Un hombre me saca de mis casillas, está parado frente a mí, bloqueandome el paso".

Greetings,

Erasmo.
 

Apher

Senior Member
Spanish - Spain
#4
It seems to me that it is a man speaking at the psychiatrist´s, and tells what he sees in dreams or something like that:

'A man brings me out of my thoughts, he is stood infront of me, blocking my path'
"Un hombre me impide pensar, está parado frente a mí, cerrándome el paso..."

But I am not sure about the meaning of "bring oneself out of their thoughts"
 

Edwin

Senior Member
USA / Native Language: English
#5
It seems to me that it is a man speaking at the psychiatrist´s, and tells what he sees in dreams or something like that:

'A man brings me out of my thoughts, he is stood infront of me, blocking my path'
"Un hombre me impide pensar, está parado frente a mí, cerrándome el paso..."

But I am not sure about the meaning of "bring oneself out of their thoughts"
A possible context: I was walking along, deep in thought, perhaps with my head down. All of a sudden, a man stood in front of me, blocking my path. This brought me out of my thoughts. (Sort of like "caused me to wake up.")

Otros ejemplos de Google: "brought me out of my thoughts"
 

losher

Senior Member
American/British hybrid
#6
Both versions are correct, Edwin. It's common enough to use the present tense to describe past events, as a way of making the story more vivid.

I forget the exact Spanish phrase used for "brings me out of my thoughts" but I seem to recall a phrase in my Spanish version of Harry Potter using ensimismarse which would fit. Perhaps a native hispanohablante will know it...

Losher
 

vehl

Senior Member
Spain-Spanish
#7
Podría traducirse por: "Un hombre me saca de mis cavilaciones, está parado frente a mí, cortándome el paso". O también por: "Un hombre me saca de mi ensimismamiento...".

Hope it helps!

Saludos,
V.
 

Edwin

Senior Member
USA / Native Language: English
#8
Both versions are correct, Edwin. It's common enough to use the present tense to describe past events, as a way of making the story more vivid.
You think "A man brings me out of my thoughts, he is stood infront of me, blocking my path" is correct?

The only way I could parse this is to imagine that a group of people stood him up in front of me. That is, they held him upright in front of me.

Maybe the following is what you mean?

A man brings me out of my thoughts. He stood in front of me blocking my path.
 

Apher

Senior Member
Spanish - Spain
#9
Both versions are correct, Edwin. It's common enough to use the present tense to describe past events, as a way of making the story more vivid.

I forget the exact Spanish phrase used for "brings me out of my thoughts" but I seem to recall a phrase in my Spanish version of Harry Potter using ensimismarse which would fit. Perhaps a native hispanohablante will know it...

Losher
Yeees!! You are right, thank you both Edwin & Losher!! "Estar ensimismado" is the state the man was in, after that another man "brings him out of his thoughts", I mean, "volver en sí" (to come round, isn´t it?)

"Un hombre me hace volver en sí, está parado frente a mí, cerrándome el paso...", but I think it can be improved...

Anyone else who helps us?
 

juramaca

Senior Member
Mexicalpan de las Tunas, TexMex
#10
Todo lo que se ha propuesto suena moderadamente bien.

Mi intento:

Un hombre me saca de mis meditaciones, esta plantado frente a mi, obstruyendo mi paso...

Esperemos a ver que proponen los demas.
 

losher

Senior Member
American/British hybrid
#11
Hi Edwin, I ran it past my oracle, and while we both think the "is stood" is grammatically correct, he considers it an uncommon usage, somewhat literary sounding.

A quick google search turns up, for example:

"..in summer a jar of flowers grown in her own garden is stood on the top of some dusty pile..." -- Street Haunting, A London Adventure, 1927, Virginia Woolf.

Note that Woolf was British, as am I. Perhaps it's a Britishism? We can take it up on the English-only forum if you'd like...

Cheers,

Losher


 

Edwin

Senior Member
USA / Native Language: English
#12
Hola, Losher, I didn't say that "is stood" is never used. And no, it's not a British only usage. The verb stand can be transitive or intransitive.

stand:
intransitive verb
1 a : to support oneself on the feet in an erect position
transitive verb
6 : to cause to stand : set upright Source
In summer the jar is stood on top of the pile is fine. To me the implication is that somebody put it there. It didn't stand by itself. But, if refering to a person one says, "he is stood in front of me"---it means to me (as I said above) that one or more people hold him upright or somehow place him in front of me.

Do you think, "he stood in front of me" and "he is stood in front of me" mean the same thing?

Ask about the whole original sentence:
'A man brings me out of my thoughts, he is stood in front of me, blocking my path'
in the English Only forum and see what people say:

It makes perfectly good sense to me, but only if you assume that somebody or some group "stood him (up) in front of me" like the jar was stood on the top of the pile in the sentence you give above. That's a possible interpretation, but we need to have the full context to know if that is reasonable. Or, if perhaps the "is" in "is stood" was put there in error?
 

losher

Senior Member
American/British hybrid
#13
Edwin, I have opened a thread in the English-only forum with the phrase in question as it's subject line. It should be interesting....

Losher
 
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