a man he might have known to have lived the longest

Ivan_I

Senior Member
Russian
A bit loaded sentences, I guess. Still, do they sound correct to you?


1 I asked Marvin yesterday about a man he might have known to have lived the longest in this settlement.
2 I asked Marvin yesterday about a man to have lived the longest in this settlement of which he might be aware of.
3 I asked Marvin yesterday about a man having lived the longest in this settlement known of by Marvin.
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    No. They are clumsy and they have grammatical mistakes e.g. two of's in the second one, where only one is required; or the wrong use of 'having lived' in sentence 3.
     

    anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I agree with grassy, none of these sentences sound correct, for various reasons. I'm not entirely sure what they are trying to convey. Do you mean to ask Marvin about a particular man who has lived in the settlement the longest? Or do you mean to ask Marvin which (unknown) man has lived in the settlement the longest?
     

    anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Then I would propose:

    I asked Marvin yesterday about which man had lived in the settlement the longest.

    Or:

    I asked Marvin yesterday which man he knew to have lived in the settlement the longest.
     

    Ivan_I

    Senior Member
    Russian
    How about this:
    I asked Marvin yesterday about a man known to him who had lived in this settlement the longest.
     
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