a marathon that you felt poor running

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
Usually the longer the race distance, the less desirable it is to run a race when not feeling well. For example, you will need more time to recover from a marathon that you felt poor running than a 5K. I certainly would recommend even dropping out of a race when not feeling well, as opposed to struggling through a race knowing it will have to be some time before you are able to run well again.
(Daniels' Running Formula; J. Daniels)

Would you be so kind as to tell me whether it can be read in either of the two following ways:

1) I felt poor running the marathon.
2) I felt the marathon (to be) poor running.


Thanks.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Because 'poor running' is not how we would describe a marathon, (or anything) that was poorly organised. If he had meant this, he would have said something like ' . . . recover from a poorly organised marathon'. He wouldn't have said 'poorly run marathon' as that might lead to ambiguity. (Well, he might have written it, but an editor would have probably changed 'run' to 'organised').

    And also because I can't see how the organisation of the marathon would have any effect on the time it takes to recover from it.

    And because he had been talking about not feeling well, so it follows that he goes on to talk about feeling poor when running.

    There are probably more reasons, but these will suffice for now. :)
     

    SuprunP

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian & Russian
    Thank you heypresto!

    So, have I understood you correctly, that you do not associate 'poor running' with 'not feeling well while running' either?

    Hence 'I felt the marathon poor running. I was tired, dehydrated, stressed... All in all I didn't feel well while running it. It was a poor experience. Not because it was poorly organised, but mostly because I wasn't ready.' wouldn't make any sense to you (or to an editor)?

    Thanks.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    'Poor running' doesn't mean 'not feeling well when running'. It could mean 'incompetent running (like any running I might do :D), but that's not what is meant here.

    I associate 'poor' with feeling unwell, and when he says ' . . . to recover from a marathon that you felt poor running' he means 'to recover from a marathon in which you felt unwell when you were running'.

    There's nothing to suggest that the marathon was badly organised.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I agree with Suprun that the original is very hard to understand. For several reasons:
    1. The dubious phrase is superfluous. The sentence "you will need more time to recover from a marathon than a 5K" is self-evident: a marathon is 42K.
    2. "You felt poor running" would normally mean "when running, you felt you had no money". You felt poor running after a bus; in a taxi you felt like a millionaire.
    3. The passage is about running when not feeling well. Poor is not a normal word for this; however poorly does exist meaning unwell.
    I think the writer needed a proofreader, who might have recommended something like this (my modifications in bold):

    Usually the longer the race distance, the less desirable it is to run a race when not feeling well. For example, you will need more time to recover from a marathon that you ran when feeling poorly, than from a 5K in the same circumstances. I certainly would recommend even dropping out of a race when not feeling well, rather than struggling through a race knowing you will be unable to run well again for some time.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I felt poor running the marathon. Everybody else running was a top-end barrister or a stockbroker.

    I don't think I felt poor running the marathon can really have any other meaning. I feel poor cannot mean that I feel that my performance is not very good.
     
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