A massive landslide which started from the hill adjacent to

Karen123456

Senior Member
Malaysia English
1. A massive landslide which started from the hill adjacent to the village, had not only blocked roads and choked the river, but also buried half of the village in mud and rocks. Several houses collapsed and many villagers, who were sleeping inside, died.

2. There was a landslide in the adjacent hill adjacent to the village

My non-native teacher said that the part in bold is wrong and should be replaced by #2.

Is she correct? Or will her sentence change the meaning of what I wrote.

Many thanks.
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I don't see anything wrong with your original, other than an omitted comma after "landslide" (although, I think it would be correct if you simply omitted the comma after "village"). Sentence 2 repeats the word "adjacent", which is an example of redundancy. Unless this is a mistake on your part in copying it, I would therefore judge it as incorrect. Also, "in" the hill is not correct, in my view: it should be "on".
     

    b1947420

    Senior Member
    British English
    I cannot really fault option 1. One small point, maybe there ought to be a comma after "landslide".

    I think option 2 is awkward with repeated use of "adjacent".

    Note.
    Simultaneous posting with Match Mole
     

    Karen123456

    Senior Member
    Malaysia English
    Hi Matching Mole and B1947420.

    I copied wrongly. The sentence should be:

    2. There was a landslide in the hill adjacent to the village

    So as both of you said, the original portion is correct and #2 is not appropriate.

    Am I on the right track?

    Thanks.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    You can have a landslide on a hill, or even from a hill. It is impossible, however, to have a landslide in a hill -- unless one is talking about a landslide that takes place underground, in a cave or a mine of some kind.
     

    b1947420

    Senior Member
    British English
    2. There was a landslide on the hill adjacent to the village that not only etc etc.

    So yes option 2) would work as amended above but I have no reason to prefer that over your attempt.
    I say that yes! you are on the right track -- well done!
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Now that you have taken away the redundant "adjacent", sentence (2) is fine (apart from the "in"):
    "There was a landslide on the hill adjacent to the village".

    Your sentence (1) is fine in terms of the usage of "adjacent", but the usage of commas is problematic. I think it should either have no commas at all, or should be as follows:
    "A massive landslide, which started from the hill adjacent to the village, had not only blocked roads and choked the river but also buried half of the village in mud and rocks."
     
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