a Master's degree

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squidink

Senior Member
Venezuela, Spanish
Hi everyone.

What's the most proper and natural way to say this?

1) She's _________ a Master's program in Literature next month.

a) entering
b) starting
c) joining
d) (other)

(In other words, she will start studying next month.)

2) She's currently ___________ a Master's degree in Literature.

a) studying
b) on
c) doing
d) (other)

It's not a question from a book, just something that's been rattling in my head.
 
  • min300

    Senior Member
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    It is a good question.
    I think, it's common to say ' studying for a Master's degree' and ' studying towards a Master's degree'.
    But don't you think that we can also say ' studying a Master's degree'?
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Hi everyone.

    What's the most proper and natural way to say this?

    1) She's _________ a Master's program in Literature next month.

    a) entering
    b) starting
    c) joining
    d) (other)

    (In other words, she will start studying next month.)

    2) She's currently ___________ a Master's degree in Literature.

    a) studying
    b) on
    c) doing
    d) (other)

    It's not a question from a book, just something that's been rattling in my head.
    I would say:
    --She's starting a Master's degree......
    --She's currently taking a Master's degree.....
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    The only time that you would "study a Master's degree" would be if you saw one hanging on the wall and you went over and read closely what was written on the certificate.

    You can only "study for" or "study towards" a Master's degree.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    1) She's starting a Masters program in Literature next month.

    2) She's currently doing a Masters degree in Literature.

    I think those are the most familiar expressions. Here is more from a university style guide:
    Apostrophes are not required for the terms bachelors degree or masters degree, nor should they be used if referring informally to ‘a masters’, as in
    She’s taking a masters in English.

     

    min300

    Senior Member
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    The only time that you would "study a Master's degree" would be if you saw one hanging on the wall and you went over and read closely what was written on the certificate.

    You can only "study for" or "study towards" a Master's degree.
    Thank you it was a very good explanation why I shouldn't use 'studying a masters degree. :)
     

    bu55ryung

    Member
    korea, korean
    Then, can I use either 'taking a Master's Degree in Accounting' or 'taking a Masters in Accounting'? Then, what does the plural form in the latter represent? My dictionary, Collins Cobuild, include only the former.
    Thanks.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Then, can I use either 'taking a Master's Degree in Accounting' or 'taking a Masters in Accounting'? Then, what does the plural form in the latter represent? My dictionary, Collins Cobuild, include only the former.
    Thanks.
    Hi, bu55ryung, welcome to the forum :)

    I think panj explained very well in post #9.
     
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