A matter of acclimation

  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm reviving this thread because the word "acclimation" has just appeared in the French-English forum. My experience is the same as Cracker Jack's (above): I've only ever heard "acclimatization" (and its BE form "acclimatisation"). My home dictionary does not recognise "acclimation" but the WR dictionary does. I wonder if many of you recognise "acclimation".
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    "Acclimation" is new to me. I am used to acclimatization.

    I see that "acclimation" is described in the Oxford Dictionary as being "chiefly North American".

    Even though I have now met it, I would not use the word.
    It sounds too much like "acclamation".
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Acclimation was used by the thermal physiologists who taught me - who were BE speakers - rather than acclimatization. So, although it is, as the COED says, chiefly North American, it is not exclusively so.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    We have no context, and no response from powerful 118. "Acclimation" could have been a typo for or misspelling of "acclamation," on the part of the original writer or of powerful 118.
    I don't think we're going to get a response from powerful 118, whose last activity on the forum was in April 2008:).

    The current question is that raised by sound shift in post 3.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    OK. I've never heard of "acclimation" either. If it's in the French-English forum, could it be an assumption that a French word spelled that way has an exact equivalent in English, as is often (but not always) the case with words of that type?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Acclimation was used by the thermal physiologists who taught me - who were BE speakers - rather than acclimatization. So, although it is, as the COED says, chiefly North American, it is not exclusively so.
    Andy, in the context in which you were taught it, did it mean something different from "acclimatisation"? If not, do you have any ideas as to why your thermal physiologist tutors used it in preference to "acclimatisation"?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    OK. I've never heard of "acclimation" either. If it's in the French-English forum, could it be an assumption that a French word spelled that way has an exact equivalent in English, as is often (but not always) the case with words of that type?
    No, that would be a wrong assumption. It is a perfectly valid English word of long standing which in BE has been used as jargon by thermal physiologists to mean much the same as acclimatization. It seems, from the dictionaries, to be much more available in the wild (ie outside physiology departments) in American English.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Andy, in the context in which you were taught it, did it mean something different from "acclimatisation"? If not, do you have any ideas as to why your thermal physiologist tutors used it in preference to "acclimatisation"?
    It was used when discussing the physiological responses involved in acclimatization to hot climates. I never did work out why they used it - I had forgotten that they did until this thread poked my memory into instant life.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    And how do you use it, Parla?
    To mean the same as acclimatization; in fact, it's more familiar to me than the latter is. I think, as others have suggested, that while both flavors of dictionaries list it, there's a bit of a split between us in usage.
     
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