a messy book, an untidy book?

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Rothko

Member
Spain/Spanish
Hello all
One of my primary students has a very messy book, he doesn't keep it clean, he writes all over it... How would you call that? A messy book, untidy book...?
Thanks
 
  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    If you're speaking about a text rather than a notebook, you might say that the book has been defaced. In general terms, you could describe it as being in poor condition.
     

    Rothko

    Member
    Spain/Spanish
    Thanks guys.
    I'm going to write a poster with rules for the Spanish class -that's why I'm asking.
    I like the 'being in poor condition' thing!
    Cheers
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hello all
    One of my primary students has a very messy book, he doesn't keep it clean, he writes all over it... How would you call that? A messy book, untidy book...?
    Thanks
    I opt for 'messy', from your description. 'Untidy', to my mind, refers to a jumble of things, or a number of items misplaced (clothes all over the floor, a table littered with papers and tea-cups), and this doesn't apply to a book. 'Defaced' usually refers to a deliberate act of near-vandalism, such as colouring-in pictures in a book, or scrawling comments all over the text. To say the book is 'in poor condition' means to me that the cover is dirty or torn or that the pages are browned with age (and this partly fulfills your description), but it brings to mind the terms used to describe the condition of books for sale: 'fine', 'good', 'poor' etc. I wouldn't apply it to an exercise book.
     

    Rothko

    Member
    Spain/Spanish
    Hi,
    I negotiated the rules with the children and they re-wrote the rule regarding books as 'having a messy, damaged book [...]'.
    The word scruffy is new to me, I like it and I think I will use it for the next poster!
    Thank you all for your answers.
     

    amby

    Banned
    chinese
    Then, what you see an essay that is not written neatly, such as a lot of cross instead of correcting the mistakes with a correction pen can I say that your essay is so messy? Also, even though it is a neatly written essay, if the paper itself is not neat , such as on a crumbled paper or a paper just torn out of a notebook, can I still say it is a messy paper?
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Then, what you see an essay that is not written neatly, such as a lot of cross instead of correcting the mistakes with a correction pen can I say that your essay is so messy?
    Yes, I think messy would fit that context.

    Also, even though it is a neatly written essay, if the paper itself is not neat , such as on a crumbled paper or a paper just torn out of a notebook, can I still say it is a messy paper?
    I wouldn't use messy here, but rather a mess, which I believe has a more general meaning than messy: The essay is good, but the paper is a mess!

    (Note that it is crumpled, not crumbled.)
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    In the case of torn-out or scrumpled pages I would say 'unacceptable presentation'.

    It's a very long time since I submitted handwritten work, but I was interested to see that our grand-daughter in a UK primary school had the same rules as we had over 50 years ago. A neat crossing out of a mistake, one line drawn with a ruler, was allowed. The mistake had to be legible so the teacher could see exactly what sort of mistakes the pupils were making and address them as necessary. I would never allow correction pens or fluids. They didn't exist in the unforgiving days I grew up in, but our granddaughter wasn't allowed them. Teachers need to see where the students are going wrong. There's the health and safety issue as well.

    Hermione
     
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