a Mistress of the Robes and a Master of Foxhounds

< Previous | Next >

chong lee

Senior Member
türkçe
Hi,
The quote is from the story "The Elk" by H. H. Munro.


For "Mistress of the Robes" wiki says "the senior lady in the royal households of Denmark, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom". And a "hound" is a hunting dog.
Neverthless I did not get how they define Teresa. Could you help me in that; thank you.

Teresa, Mrs. Thropplestance, was the richest and most intractable old woman in the county of Woldshire. In her dealings with the world in general her manner suggested a blend between a Mistress of the Robes and a Master of Foxhounds, with the vocabulary of both.
 
  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    A Master of Foxhounds is the person in charge of the hunting dogs. Typically this person would not be very refined, and would be apt to have a vocabulary that, in the words of Henry Higgins, would make a sailor blush.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    That is indeed my Henry, from the musical My Fair Lady, originally Shaw's play Pygmalion.
    He says, in conversation with Pickering, "all at once you're using language that would make a sailor blush".
    Sailors are (were) known for their rough and rude language, and the people to whom Higgins is referring are using language that is much worse than that, so bad that even sailors would find it offensive.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top