~a model sat, <from whom anyone who liked> could go and draw~

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park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The protagonist, Philip, who was born with a club foot, moved in with his uncle Mr. Carey, the Vicar of Blackstable after his mother's death.
He came to Paris to learn to paint.
...........................
"I must be getting along to the studio," she said. "Are you going to the sketch classes?"
Philip did not know anything about them, and she told him that from five to six every evening a model sat, from whom anyone who liked could go and
draw at the cost of fifty centimes. They had a different model every day, and it was very good practice.
[Of Human Bondage by Somerset Maugham]
I'd like to know what "anyone who liked from a model" means.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's a terrible sentence. I read most of Somerset Maughan in my teens but I can't recall much detail, just great story telling. I hope there wasn't much like this to recall! He means that there was a 'life model' sketching session every day to which anybody who wanted could go at the cost of 50 centimes.

    Anybody 'who wanted' means public or open to all. I suppose it's a reasonable way of saying you didn't have to sign up for a course or pay up for a fixed number of sessions.
    I occasionally went to a class like this at an art school I lived near in Manhattan. 'Life model' means a real live person, nude or dressed, who takes on several poses during the hour for say two minutes or four or fifteen, whatever.
    There was someone there supervising the session but no tuition. It's simply an opportunity to practice that's otherwise hard to come by.
    We do talk about 'drawing from life' as an expression, but it doesn't fit at all well into 'from whom anybody ... could go and draw'. It sounds like something written quickly and not smoothed out on re-reading.

    I checked and it seems to be both life model and life-drawing class. (UK Register of Life Models)
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I don't think there's anything wrong with saying something like: "She was the model from whom Hayes T. Daub often painted."

    I agree that the Maugham example is clumsy though.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Anyone who wanted to could go and draw from a model who sat ...
    Maugham seemed determined not to have a preposition in the wrong place:
    "She was a model anyone who wanted to could draw from." is the structure up with which he could not put:eek: but the draw and from are now completely separated and even native speakers are confused. Perhaps "draw from" should have been promoted to a phrasal verb before he started writing:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, it's old-fashioned in BrE (at least in my BrE...)

    Draw from a model
    Anyone could draw from a model
    Anyone who liked could draw from a model
    A model from whom anyone who liked could draw
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    There's no question we can draw a model. It is if we draw based on seeing a real model in front of us, rather than a memory or photograph, that "draw from" is used. Often also seen as drawn from life. Turner sketched many scenes in his notebook when he was out travelling. When he got back to the studio he painted his large canvases from those sketches.

    Cross posted with Waltern :thumbsup:
     
    Yes, draw from life ("real life") is a set phrase to contrast drawing from memory or photographs, which means, with a real model in front of me, I am drawing the model directly, and would never say, "I'm drawing from the model."

    I'm in art class drawing objects in the room and am supposed to say "I'm drawing from the orange, drawing from the lamp, when what I'm doing is drawing an orange and drawing a lamp??? :confused: :D

    (Unless of course I'm perched atop the orange, atop the lamp, and, ahem, perched atop the live model.:))
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Yes, draw from life ("real life") is a set phrase to contrast drawing from memory or photographs, which means, with a real model in front of me, I am drawing the model directly, and would never say, "I'm drawing from the model."

    I'm in art class drawing objects in the room and am supposed to say "I'm drawing from the orange, drawing from the lamp, when what I'm doing is drawing an orange and drawing a lamp??? :confused: :D

    (Unless of course I'm perched atop the orange, atop the lamp, and, ahem, perched atop the live model.:))
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:

    Drawing "from life" and "from memory" sound perfectly normal to me, but those phrases describe how I am drawing, not what I am drawing. I may be drawing Dale's orange from life, but I'm still "drawing" the orange, not "drawing from" it.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Examples of "drawing from a model" are not so hard to find.

    Suzanne Perling Hudson - 2009 - ‎Art (On Robert Ryman, who started painting lessons in the fifties) Both Hudson and Ryman are American.

    ...Ryman put so little stock in the episode's value that he claims to have forgotten most of its specifics, other than that he likely drew from a model, worked with collage, and gained some insights into materials and techniques.

    Robert Ryman
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Drawing "from life" and "from memory" sound perfectly normal to me, but those phrases describe how I am drawing, not what I am drawing.
    That's exactly the distinction people are making - and it is used mainly in: from life, from memory and from a model. People don't use it for oranges or trains and no-one is advocating that:)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I didn't see anyone saying you must use it.
    :thumbsup:
    Collectively, what we're saying is "That's the construction being used by Somerset Maugham in PSJ's extract." We're saying nothing about whether people should follow suit;).
     
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