a more economical car

Etzatlan

Member
Español
This phrase(without more context): we should buy a more economical car.

Could it mean both?:

1. We should buy a more inexpensive car.
2. We should buy a more fuel-efficient car.

Thanks for any help.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I think it could, Etzatlan, but "economical" is a poor choice to express the idea "inexpensive". It should refer to something that makes the car less expensive to operate rather than less expensive to buy.
     

    Etzatlan

    Member
    Español
    I think it could, Etzatlan, but "economical" is a poor choice to express the idea "inexpensive". It should refer to something that makes the car less expensive to operate rather than less exp kiensive to buy.
    Thanks owlman:), so if economical is a bad choice for that, then in this other sentence, would it be better to use:
    "it would be more inexpensive to buy the bigger size" than "it would be more economical to buy the bigger size"
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    You're welcome. "Economical" makes a lot more sense in talk about buying things in bulk. You get more food for each dollar you spend when you buy something in bulk. That justifies the use of "economical" in the context of buying "economy-sized" or "family-sized" bags of cereal, etc.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    If the 1-lkilo bag costs $10 and the 2-kilo bag costs $9, then the larger size is more inexpensive as well as more economical. (We'd probably say "less expensive" or "cheaper," not "more inexpensive.")

    If the 1-lkilo bag costs $10 and the 2-kilo bag costs $15, then the larger size is more is just more economical
     
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