a more wonderful Wonderbra

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
The new creative director at an advertising agency is giving a task to the executives: each is given a box with some products for women:
— Each kit contains anti-wrinkle cream, mascara, moisturizing lipstick, bath beads, quick-dry nail polish, an at-home waxing kit, a more wonderful Wonderbra, a home pregnancy test, hair volumizer, pore cleansing strips, Advil, control-top pantyhose and a Visa card. Now I want everybody to come up with something — for one product, for two, the whole box-- whatever moves you. We'll get together tomorrow, have a little show-and-tell, see where we are.
What Women Want, film

Could you tell me, a more wonderful than what?
Thanks.
 
Last edited:
  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I wonder if it must be a reference to an old Wonderbra commercial that has a song in it with the words "wonderful, wonderful, Wonderbra".
    You could find it as "1979 Wonderbra Television Commercial by Richard Avedon".
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Well, I'm probably the wrong person to ask, because as a man, I'm not that interested in the Wonderbra itself, I'm more interested in what's behind it... :p
    Bras are fashion articles and fashion changes at least twice a year. So I find it very hard to believe that the current model of Wonderbra is still the same as in 1979. Since the Creative Director is talking about a 'more wonderful Wonderbra' without stating an object of comparison, it is normally understood as "more wonderful than what we currently have." (i.e. an existing version is compared with a new, improved version)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Yes, but I mean, why did she use the word "wonderful" at all?

    It's because of the "wonder" in Wonderbra, and that musical theme; otherwise, with another adjective it would not make much sense; for example, if she'd said: "a more marvelous Wonderbra", it would not convey the intended meaning, would it?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Yes, but I mean, why did she use the word "wonderful" at all?

    It's because of the "wonder" in Wonderbra, and that musical theme; otherwise, with another adjective it would not make much sense; for example, if she'd said: "a more marvelous Wonderbra", it would not convey the intended meaning, would it?
    Any one would very naturally come up with "wonderful" and "a wonder" as descriptive terms from the name "Wonderbra". It doesn't take an advertising genius or someone who remembers a commercial from their childhood.
    "Marvelous" would convey the same meaning but would lack the word play. It could have just said "a better Wonderbra."

    This company is not the company that makes Wonderbra so they want to include a bra that's better than a Wonderbra.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Sorry what did you mean? It's a better Wonderbra, not another bra that is better than a Wonderbra; am I wrong?
    It is hard to tell. The wording is odd, isn't it? Everything else is a product, with no degree of quality attached to it, yet here in the middle is "a more wonderful Wonderbra". "A Wonderbra" would make sense, and so would "a wonderful Wonderbra", even though this would not fit the pattern of the other items. You might argue that if you can have "a wonderful Wonderbra" then you can also have "a more wonderful Wonderbra", but it does not really work when you come to analyse the sentence; more wonderful than what?

    However, it does work, in English, because of the extreme flexibility that the English language offers. Neither manfy nor Myridon even noticed the logical flaw, because the overall meaning seems so obvious: a better Wonderbra than the current model, with "wonderful" chosen as the adjective because it is such an obvious fit with "Wonderbra". If the meaning of a sentence is readily apparent, we tend to overlook logical inconsistencies. If the meaning is not clear, we will scratch our heads, puzzled, even though the language may be perfect.
     
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