a name goes up

< Previous | Next >

HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
Hi, how are you?

Does the 'went up' below mean 'went up the obelisk' or just 'was accepted'? Could you say 'a name goes up ' when he/she is just selected as one of people in a group, and when there isn't a list of the names positioned vertically (as on an obelisk) in such examples as:

[1] The party was discussing who would be good for their gubernatorial candidate for the race. Suddenly toward the end of the meeting John's name went up.

It has always bothered him (= Bob's father), although he had never complained about it in public, that he had been left off the [war] memorial. ... Then, toward the end of his life, there had been an article ... asking families of veterans if they knew of anyone who had served in the the military during wartime, and who had inadvertent been left off the memorial. ... My dad had responded. ... His name went up before he died. ('And You Know You Should Be Glad' by Bob Greene)



 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    It means that his name went onto the monument. It doesn't say anything about the orientation of the names. The direction "up" refers, as I see it, only to the fact that the names are displayed above ground or floor level, in the same way that you might say you "hung a picture up on the wall" in your house.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Thanks. If you are looking at a bulletin board, there are the names of the people who passed an examination, and your name is included, you could certainly say 'My name went up,' couldn't you?

    Hiro
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Yes, although under those circumstances it would be more natural to speak of the fact that your name is up ("My name is up there!"), and not of the past action of putting your name up ("My name went up").
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    Are [1] and the indented paragraph all from the same source, in sequence, with nothing between them? There isn't anything in [1] about a monument. That's just two sentences about a meeting considering gubernatorial (US English: pertaining to a state governor) candidates. It would be idiomatic to say that someone's name suddenly came up, i.e., that it was suggested by someone, or even several people simultaneously, without any previous discussion. "Went up" doesn't make a lot of sense unless there was a mysterious outside force posting names on the wall, a blackboard, etc., like the hand of God at Belshazar's Feast.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Could you say 'a name goes up ' when he/she is just selected as one of people in a group, and when there isn't a list of the names positioned vertically (as on an obelisk) in such examples as:

    [1] The party was discussing who would be good for their gubernatorial candidate for the race. Suddenly toward the end of the meeting John's name went up.
    It's bothering me . . .

    How can a name suddenly appear on a monument towards the end of a meeting?
    Are [1] and the indented paragraph all from the same source, in sequence, with nothing between them?
    [1] is my own work. I was just wondering if you could say '(a name) goes up' when there was no list, roster, etc. placed upright.

    Thank you all for your help.:)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top