a narrow slit in the line of dead-coloured brick

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Couch Tomato

Senior Member
Russian & Dutch
This conversation had occurred while our cab had been threading its way through a long succession of dingy streets and dreary by-ways. In the dingiest and dreariest of them our driver suddenly came to a stand. "That's Audley Court in there," he said, pointing to a narrow slit in the line of dead-coloured brick.
(A Study in Scarlet - Arthur Conan Doyle; Full text)

Could you please explain this underlined part? I do not quite understand what this means. Because "brick" is used uncountably, I take it that there are several bricks and there is a narrow hole in between two or more bricks. Or not? What is going on here?

Thank you in advance.
 
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  • JustKate

    Senior Member
    I think the "narrow slit" refers to a narrow driveway or carriage-way. You've got all these dingy houses made of "dead-coloured brick," and they form what is almost a wall. But in that wall of houses is this narrow slit, and you drive up that to get to Audley Court.

    That's my best guess, anyway. I tried to find the passage in an online version of the book, but I couldn't locate it and then ran out of time.

    (Cross-posted with Edmont.)
     

    Couch Tomato

    Senior Member
    Russian & Dutch
    That's my best guess, anyway. I tried to find the passage in an online version of the book, but I couldn't locate it and then ran out of time.
    Thank you, JustKate. The full text can be found here. I've also linked to it in the opening post and I will do that in the future. I should have read a bit further. The next couple of sentences reveal what "Audley Court" is:

    Audley Court was not an attractive locality. The narrow passage led us into a quadrangle paved with flags and lined by sordid dwellings.
     
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