A neuroscientist is working ... when he ... mistake

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evergreenhomeland

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello everyone:

By using "A neuroscientist is working in his laboratory one day when he thinks he has stumbled upon a big mistake.",
does the author want to stress "when he thinks he has made a big mistake"?

Can I rephrase it into this one "a neuroscientist is working in his laboratory one day, all of sudden he thinks he has stumbled upon a big mistake"?



In 2005, James Fallon's life started to resemble the plot of a well-honed joke or big-screen thriller: A neuroscientist is working in his laboratory one day when he thinks he has stumbled upon a big mistake. He is researching Alzheimer's and using his healthy family members' brain scans as a control, while simultaneously reviewing the fMRIs of murderous psychopaths for a side project. It appears, though, that one of the killers' scans has been shuffled into the wrong batch.

The source is the essay "Life as a Nonviolent Psychopath" by JUDITH OHIKUARE from http://www.theatlantic.com/
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    There is no need to reword it -- and "stumbled" here already carries the idea of "all of a sudden," so to say the same thing twice is not good. And your reworded version connects two sentences with a comma, which you shouldn't do -- you would either use a semicolon or a period/full stop. Also, it may not be his mistake -- it could be the mistake of someone else.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Yes, the final clause of the original is emphasized.

    Your paraphrase is approximately equivalent, but you have broken it into two separate sentences, so it would be punctuated differently.
    A neuroscientist is working in his laboratory one day. All of sudden he thinks he has stumbled upon a big mistake.
    .

    Thank you for naming the source and author so nicely. :thumbsup:

    Cross-posted with a sleepy cat.
     
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